TTC and Me

What’s Staying the Same

  • You will not lose your job. You will not have to re-apply for your job.
  • The work you do will not change.
  • Your pay will not be cut.
  • You will not receive a raise. Any increases in pay are out of scope of the project and will need to be funded and planned over time by leadership.
  • Your current benefits package will remain the same. Based on the Mercer benefits analysis and stakeholder input, the project team will recommend a benefits strategy by January 1, 2020 to enhance UW benefits offerings and help keep UW competitive within the market.
  • Changes to current benefits offerings are out of scope of this project and subject to Board of Regents and legislature reviews and approvals.

My Job

The work you currently do is not changing. Job titles will be more organized and consistent across the UW System. There will be an internal title that is consistent throughout the organization referred to as your official title or title of record. Each job title will have a standard job description that is clear, concise, and describes the core work commonly done in each job. For a complete list of the updated job titles, see the Title & Standard Job Description (SJD) Library.

In Spring 2020, UW System will have a new official title structure without title progression or prefixes. Jobs in the new title structure that do have a levels (e.g. I, II, and III) are not meant to be an automatic career progression, but rather are meant to distinguish between scope and complexity of work performed.

After Spring 2020, progression and promotion will mean two different things. Progression (pay progression) will be a movement, or an increase in pay, within your pay range within the same job. A promotion will be an advancement to a new job with a higher pay range.

  • Pay progression means that your job title and core responsibilities remain the same. Increases in pay move your pay higher within your job’s pay range, and are based on increasing levels of independence, knowledge, skills, experience, and good performance.
  • A promotion will happen when you move from one job to another job, which means a higher pay range for a different set of core responsibilities.

Institutions, at the direction of their Chancellors, may recognize career status with business titles, which may contain prefixes.

New salary administration guidelines will better help UW System provide the opportunity for pay increases throughout an employee’s career, whether they progress in their current job over years, or move to another job through a promotion. There is no set amount of pay increases an employee can get within the concept of pay progression, allowing institutions more flexibility in moving their employees through a range of pay based on experience and performance.

Increases in pay are contingent on available funds, changes in the market, and maintaining equitable pay across the UW System. Institution Human Resources units, in collaboration with leadership and finance units, are currently developing internal processes for progression and promotion.

Find out how this will work with the Progression and Promotion Learning Series.

Each standard job description will include a job summary, a list of essential job responsibilities, and qualifications, which include preferred or required minimum education. It will not include a list of tasks. Task lists can be documented in standard operating procedures, performance evaluations, recruitment materials, or checklists managed at the department or unit level. An employee can do more than what is in a standard job description.

Final proposed mapping of each employee to a job is underway. Employees will review and discuss their updated job title and standard job description during conversations with their manager between December 2019 and March 2020.

Before these conversations begin, managers will have employee’s updated job title information. Managers are expected to share this information with their employees 72 hours prior to their scheduled meeting. Institution Human Resources units will coordinate the scheduling of employee-manager conversations at your institution.

The discussion will focus on making sure your updated job title and standard job description accurately reflects the core work of the job. Employee feedback and questions are completely valid and expected at these meetings. If there is not informal resolution as the result of these conversations, then the next step is for the employee to ask for a review of the title in the form of a title appeal. 

Pay and benefits will not be discussed during this conversation. Those are the next steps in the project. We want you to know that your pay nor your benefits will be reduced. Before we can have any discussions on pay, we need to have the new job structure in place before we can accurately map the jobs to new pay ranges. That information will be provided in 2020 and will be part of an effort to address pay and benefits disparities. Your manager also will not have any additional information at this time. Additionally, the discussion will not focus on your tasks, performance, or career goals. This is not a time to jockey for a promotion or discuss performance.

The project is strategically separating the discussion about job titles from pay ranges. We want to make sure employees and managers appropriately assess the core work of the job relative to job titles and standard job descriptions. Introducing compensation before or during the title discussion may introduce unintentional bias for higher or lower job titles. Right now, the focus is on the work being performed and the job alignment, rather than on compensation.

Managers do not have additional information on compensation structure or pay policies at this point. We will ensure managers are equipped with talking points that provide information on ways employees can move within their pay range versus promoting to a new job with a higher pay range to get a raise. Find out how this will work with the Progression and Promotion Learning Series.

We are looking for a best fit (about 80% fit) for the job title and standard job description for the work an employee does on a regular and consistent basis. Although an employee may perform the duties of other standard job descriptions, a best fit job title and job description must represent the core function of their job. A trick to find a best fit is to ask, if that position was open right now, what job title would I use recruit for that job?

When you have your employee-manager conversation, it will be based on the initial proposed match from your institution Human Resources unit and manager. At that time, if there is a disagreement or concern about the proposed match, you should indicate that issue to your manager. Your manager will provide the rationale for the selected match. Your manager will follow up with your institution Human Resources unit to answer your remaining questions.

Managers will review and confirm their employee’s updated job title and standard job description. The purpose of the standard job description is to use it to match to the labor market. If a proposed standard job description has substantial changes, then it could indicate that the job does not closely match or provide about an 80% match to the work an employee performs, and may not be the right match. Managers can reach out to their institutional Human Resources units to request changes prior to or after meeting with their employees.

Only job title can be appealed, not the wording of the job description. If after your employee-manager conversations you still don’t agree with the proposed match, you will have the opportunity to make a formal appeal. In Spring 2020, you will receive the official notice of new job title and job description from UW System. This notice will include instructions on the institutional title appeal process.

Appeals will be handled at the institution level, with the involvement of governance representatives. The specifics of the appeal process will look different at each institution, but all appeals will follow systemwide minimum standards. The title appeal decision ultimately resides at each institution.

We will have working titles called “Business Titles”. If there is a business need you can request a business title through your supervisor/manager and institutional Human Resource unit, however, there will be guidelines.

For example, a business title cannot duplicate a title in the official title structure (Title & SJD Library); misrepresent the university or the authority of a position; or use words that are recognized as typically associated with executive titles like Chancellor, Provost, or President. See the Business Title Guidelines Learning Series.

Yes, distinguished title will still exist and can be used as a business title.

In Spring 2020, UW System will have a new official title structure without title progression or prefixes. Jobs in the new title structure that do have a levels (e.g. I, II, and III) are not meant to be an automatic career progression, but rather are meant to distinguish between scope and complexity of work performed.

After Spring 2020, progression and promotion will mean two different things. Progression (pay progression) will be a movement, or an increase in pay, within your pay range within the same job. A promotion will be an advancement to a new job with a higher pay range.

  • Pay progression means that your job title and core responsibilities remain the same. Increases in pay move your pay higher within your job’s pay range, and are based on increasing levels of independence, knowledge, skills, experience, and good performance.
  • A promotion will happen when you move from one job to another job, which means a higher pay range for a different set of core responsibilities.

Institutions, at the direction of their Chancellors, may recognize career status with business titles, which may contain prefixes.

New salary administration guidelines will better help UW System provide the opportunity for pay increases throughout an employee’s career, whether they progress in their current job over years, or move to another job through a promotion. There is no set amount of pay increases an employee can get within the concept of pay progression, allowing institutions more flexibility in moving their employees through a range of pay based on experience and performance. Increases in pay are contingent on available funds, changes in the market, and maintaining equitable pay across the UW System. Institution Human Resources units, in collaboration with leadership and finance units, are currently developing internal processes for progression and promotion.

Find out how this will work with the Progression and Promotion Learning Series and Progression and Promotion video.

My Pay

Your pay will not be cut. You will not receive a raise. Adjustments to pay are not part of this project. Your job will be part of a new, market-informed pay structure.

This project is about getting the data so UW System and institutional leadership can make informed decisions and advocate for equitable pay and benefits in the future.

The new pay structure and any inequities will be presented to leadership later this year for review. Institutions will then develop a long-range strategy to address pay inequities and market deficiencies.

We will provide more information about the updated compensation structure in Spring 2020, after UW System finalizes the title structure. Pay ranges will be posted in the Title & Standard Job Description Library once they are made public.

One of the project’s next steps, after the job title structure is finalized, is to propose a strategy to UW System and institutional leadership to address what happens when employees are outside of the pay range in their updated job title.

Once developed, the market-informed pay ranges will lead to an update of pay programs and policies. Any disparities in pay for specific jobs are not part of the project. Pay programs and policies will need to be updated, planned, and funded over time by leadership at individual UW System institutions to address compensation issues.

Introducing compensation before or during the title discussion may introduce unintentional bias for higher or lower job titles. Right now, the focus is on the work being performed and the job alignment, rather than on compensation. Managers do not have additional information on compensation structure or pay policies at this point.

Absolutely. Part of the reason why this project is so important is that if UW System wants to be able to advocate for the best competitive pay for employees, UW System needs to have data to support that advocacy. The project allows UW System to gather the necessary title and compensation data so that leadership can look at solutions.

Our current system does not accurately reflect the job market. We are comparing what is being offered currently at UW System to what other employers with similar workforces are offering. The results will guide us toward making your pay competitive. This will allow UW System and your institution leadership to fund and plan for future changes in pay.

UW System is working with Mercer Consulting to identify pay ranges that are positioned competitively within peer markets. These new pay structures will show a pay range that coincides with a Compensation Philosophy that sets affordable and flexible pay ranges compared to the market ranges.

Individual pay questions and a plan for a minimum base wage are outside the scope of the project.

As a result of this project, there will be more systemwide guidance for institution Human Resources units on how to move employees through their pay ranges based on a number of factors like performance, knowledge, and skills. This practice will help systemwide employee pay be more market competitive and equitable. Find out how this will work with the Progression and Promotion Learning Series and our Progression and Promotion video.

My Benefits

An in-depth review of benefits has not been done on a comprehensive basis at the institution for almost 30 years. The goal is for you to have rewarding, enriching job opportunities, with competitive benefit rewards.

You will not see any immediate changes to your benefits as a result of this project. Changes to current benefits offerings are not part of the project at this time. The goal is to maintain, strengthen, or enhance benefits offerings.

Based on the Benefits Survey Analysis and Employee Benefits Preferences Survey, UW System will recommend a benefits strategy in 2020 to enhance benefits offerings and help keep UW System competitive while meeting the needs and preferences of employees. UW System will not use the results of the benefits survey or analysis to make cuts to current benefits.

Any proposed changes to benefits are subject to Board of Regents and legislature reviews and approvals.

The goal is to keep people here at the UW System and provide them the ability to grow within the new Job Framework and compensation structure. We also want to be able to compete with those employers who we recruit employees from and lose employees to.

The term ‘benefits’ applies to a variety of offerings or programs that, combined with pay, make up an employee’s total compensation. These programs include leave, financial wellness, health and wellness, employee engagement, and professional growth opportunities.

Some preliminary key findings include:

  • Most valued employee benefit at hire: Type of work and healthcare benefits
  • Most valued employee benefit once employed: Pay, healthcare benefits, retirement plans, paid leave, job security, and job flexibility
  • The importance of pay (ranked #1) declines with age and the importance of healthcare and retirement increases
  • Sick leave and income protection are of “above average” importance

Some preliminary key findings are that the UW System provides competitive benefits offerings across both university peer groups and Wisconsin peer groups, especially in the areas of retirement savings and health insurance.

  • UW is competitive across university peers in health insurance, retirement/savings and leave
  • UW is competitive across Wisconsin peers in health insurance, retirement/savings and leave

Employees have been involved with the benefits recommendation. In December 2018, a little more than 18,400 employees participated in the benefits preferences survey. In January 2019, a long-term strategy will kick off and recommendations that includes employee feedback will be presented to leadership.

Academic Staff and University Staff employment categories will not change.