1. UW-Madison launches nation’s first rural obstetrics and gynecology residency

    Ellen Hartenbach, MD, director of UW-Madisons Rural Residency program

    Madison, Wisconsin – Faced with a nationwide shortage of obstetricians and gynecologists, especially in rural areas, the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health has started the nation’s first rural-residency program to train and provide care to women in rural Wisconsin. Residency is medical training where

  2. The importance of PAs: UW-La Crosse physician assistant program continues to fill health care shortage

    Students studying to become physician assistants learn skills that allow them to to fill many duties previously completed by doctors.

    When UW-La Crosse graduate Jessica DeBruyne decided to continue her education to become a physician assistant, she looked no further than her alma mater. Factors like a 100 percent pass rate on the Physician Assistant National Certifying Exam among graduates, small class sizes and a partnership with two leading healthcare institutions, made UWL’s program particularly

  3. UW-La Crosse exercise program brings community health, trains students for careers

    Long-term participants in the La Crosse Exercise and Health Program during an open house celebrating the program’s 45 years at UW-La Crosse. Kim Radtke, program director, is pictured at bottom right. John Porcari, the previous program director, is in the back row, far right.

    La Crosse resident John Zoerb vividly recalls when his heart attack hit 30 years ago. A heavy feeling came over him — like an elephant on his chest — as he sat alone in his business office at La Crosse Floral. Zoerb had enough strength to get up from his chair and drive himself to

  4. UW-Oshkosh nursing grads complete scholarly projects, put learning into practice

    UW-Oshkosh nursing graduates

    Fourteen University of Wisconsin Oshkosh graduate students recently put their nursing knowledge to work, translating best evidence into practice as part of a Doctor of Nursing Practice scholarly project. Bonnie Nickasch, assistant director of advanced practice nursing at UW Oshkosh, said the scholarly projects give students the opportunity to synthesize the knowledge they have learned

  5. UW-River Falls professor shares cutting-edge research at National Cancer Moonshot Summit

    UW-River Falls Biology Professor Tim Lyden (far right) and his Duluth industrial partner co-presented cutting-edge cancer research at the first White House–sponsored national Cancer Moonshot Summit regional event at the University of Minnesota-Duluth Medical School on June 29.

    University of Wisconsin-River Falls biology Professor Tim Lyden and his Duluth industrial partner co-presented cutting-edge cancer research at the first White House sponsored national Cancer Moonshot Summit regional event at the UM-Duluth Medical School June 29. During the summit, Lyden presented ongoing 3D cancer modeling research to the public. In concert with staff from BRTI

  6. UW-Milwaukee undergraduate research leads to parental advice

    Undergraduate psychology student Haley Branback presented her research on the effects of parental criticism at UW-Milwaukee’s Undergraduate Research Symposium. (Photo courtesy of Haley Branback)

    Parents, if you don’t want your child to take life too seriously, lay off criticizing them. That’s the conclusion psychology major Haley Branback reached as a result of her research examining how parental expectations and criticisms affect their children’s sense of responsibility later in life. She gave a poster presentation on her project at UW-Milwaukee’s

  7. UW-Platteville concussion research reveals surprising evidence about football and brain injury

    Dr. Matthew Rogatzki draws the blood from the football player prior to a JV game for analysis of biomarkers.

    PLATTEVILLE, Wis. — Concussion research recently conducted by Dr. Matthew Rogatzki, assistant professor of health and human performance at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville, and his research team suggests something that may be surprising – that playing football in the absence of concussion injury is no more dangerous to the brain than any other sport. A

  8. UW-Green Bay college kid makes good: Top doctor returns to serve region’s children

    Ask Dr. Tina Sauerhammer about the seminal moments in her life, and the answer may surprise you. She won’t, as one might rightly expect, start with being part of the surgical team that performed the first-ever full face transplant in the United States in 2011. She’ll gloss over the fact that she entered college at

  9. UW-La Crosse student leaves a lasting impact by donating a kidney to a stranger

    UW-La Crosse senior Devyn Prielipp believes in living life compassionately. She donated a kidney to a stranger.

    UW-La Crosse senior Devyn Prielipp was only 14 when her mother was murdered during a domestic violence dispute. The tragedy changed the way she looked at life. She decided to live for today — a direction that led her to give life to someone else. Only three years after her family tragedy, Prielipp began talking

  10. UW-Eau Claire social work students first to research impacts of personalized music on caregivers

    Social work students Joyce Idárraga, left, and Alissa Peanasky, right, look at the iPods they used for their research project examining the impact of personalized music on dementia caregivers.

    UW-Eau Claire social work students are making a difference with never-done-before research on dementia caregivers — one personalized iPod at a time. Through a grant issued by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services Division of Long Term Care, associate professor of social work Dr. Lisa Quinn-Lee, professor emeritus Dr. Donald Mowry and four undergraduate social