1. UW-Milwaukee water program links students to careers

    Anuja Patel, a student at Gateway Technical College, works in the lab at UWM's School of Freshwater Sciences. Research in the lab is part of the Water SYS-STEM internship. (IWM Photo/Derek Rickert)

    Krista Vanderwerff was working on a degree in mechanical engineering at Waukesha County Technical College, but she had never heard of possibilities in the growing water industry. Now she’s done internships at Graef Engineering Consultants and Evoqua Water Technologies in Waukesha and is planning to come to UW-Milwaukee (UWM) for an advanced degree. Tommy Thor,

  2. UW-Stout Student Power: Solar panels to provide energy for first time on campus building

    Future installation of 36 solar panels on the rooftop of a UW-Stout building began with approval of a Stout Student Association Sustainability Council recommendation. Shown in front of Merle M. Price Commons, where the panels will be installed, are: front row, left to right, council adviser Sarah Rykal, council members Laura Donovan and Kennedy Crever; back row, council members Ben Ritter, Jared Allen and Maggie Thesing.

    Menomonie, Wis. — Driven by students’ perseverance to build on campus sustainability, University of Wisconsin–Stout will tap the sun to partially power a campus building. A proposal to install 36 solar panels on top of Merle M. Price Commons recently was approved by the Stout Student Association, the university’s student government council. Since receiving state

  3. Research buzz: UW-Stout professor, students identify bacterium that may kill honey bees

    Jim Burritt, associate professor of biology, is photographed Tuesday, July 7, 2015 in a biotechnology lab in Jarvis Hall, while working with students and lab assistants on his two-year bee study project, "Honey Bee Hemocyte Profiling by Flow Cytometry". Burritt is trying to help figure out the problem known as hive winter kill, which is threatening the honeybee industry and possibly even the species itself. (UW-Stout photo by Brett T. Roseman)

    Menomonie, Wis. — A University of Wisconsin-Stout biology professor and his students may have made an important discovery in the effort to determine why honey bee hives are dying out during the winters in the Upper Midwest. Biology Professor Jim Burritt and his students have published research about a new strain of the bacterium called

  4. UW-La Crosse professor earns Innovator of the Year award for green chemistry contributions

    Robert McGaff, professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, received the Innovator of the Year Award from WiSys Technology Foundation. Here he is pictured in the lab with Rachel Butler, one of his student research assistants.

    Mother Nature isn’t the only one happy about UW-La Crosse Professor Robert McGaff’s innovations in green chemistry. McGaff, Chemistry and Biochemistry, received the Innovator of the Year Award from WiSys Technology Foundation for his research that is making Earth-friendly chemistry more commercially viable. The inaugural award goes to just one innovator each year from the 11

  5. Power tap: UW-Stout research, tenacity could bring electricity to more Malawi homes

    UW-Stout Professor Tom Lacksonen and Hastings Mkwandwire, a resident of Mzuzu, Malawi, observe one of Mkwandwire’s hand-built hydroelectric generators under a metal covering.

    Electricity could become a reality for more homes in a city in northern Malawi, Africa, because of a University of Wisconsin-Stout professor’s research and resourceful students’ problem-solving skills. Tom Lacksonen, an operations and management professor, traveled to the mountainous city of Mzuzu in January with manufacturing engineering and computer engineering student Josh Miller. Their mission:

  6. UW-Extension Sustainability Student Perspectives: How I Brought Sustainability to My Air Force Base

    Nicholas Wengerd, a student in the UW Sustainable Management program

    I am an electrician and a member of the U.S. Air Force, stationed in Germany. You may wonder, how does a Bachelor of Science in Sustainable Management relate to my career? Some civilians may not know this, but the military is currently exploring ways to make its daily operations more sustainable. It’s all about doing more

  7. UW-Milwaukee develops smart buoy to monitor area beaches

    A new buoy built by UW-Milwaukee researchers will improve water-quality warnings and help Milwaukee’s health department better monitor conditions at city beaches. Faculty members Todd Miller and Matthew Smith, along with post-doctoral fellow Lucas Beversdorf, constructed the buoy at the School of Freshwater Sciences to gather minute-by-minute information about conditions around Bradford Beach and transmit

  8. UW Sustainable Management Student Helps “Green” the Green Bay Packers

    The online Sustainable Management master’s program is a collaborative effort of five UW System institutions: UW-Green Bay, UW-Oshkosh, UW-Parkside, UW-Stout, and UW-Superior. Launched in 2013, the master’s degree program is designed for working adults with real-world experience and offers flexibility to students who balance family, a job, and other commitments. A veteran, his family, and a

  9. Blugolds help city of Eau Claire improve sustainability, life through internship program

    Derek Dahlk, this summer's city of Eau Claire community planning department intern, stands in front of Eau Claire City Hall.

    UW-Eau Claire environmental studies students are working toward a greener Eau Claire community while simultaneously getting a valuable internship opportunity. For the last three years, Ned Noel, associate planner for the city of Eau Claire, has hired environmental studies students through a connection to UW-Eau Claire’s Watershed Institute for Collaborative Environmental Studies. Past interns include

  10. UW-Stout leads Red Cedar River reinvestment

    Menomonie, Wis. — Local and regional partners in a new collaborative effort, led by University of Wisconsin-Stout, the Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, are ready to harness their resources to improve water quality in the Red Cedar River watershed. The DNR recently awarded a $200,000 lake protection grant to the