1. UW-Milwaukee signs pledge to reduce emissions, plan for climate adaptation

    The green roof at Sandburg Hall is just one of UWM’s efforts to lessen the university’s impact on the environment. At the time of its installation in 2008, It was the largest green roof in Wisconsin. (UWM Photo/Troye Fox)

    On a hot summer morning, the thermostats “know” to air-condition the buildings when the first researchers arrive. Occupancy-sensitive digital temperature controls are just one cost-effective strategy that UW-Milwaukee uses to reduce energy usage. When the state of Wisconsin challenged all UW schools to cut energy consumption by 20% from 2005 levels, the university’s Office of

  2. UW-Milwaukee joins research center aimed at producing safer, more sustainable energy

    Adel Nasiri, associate dean for research and UWM professor of electrical engineering, speaks to the media at a news conference about UWM joining a partnership that aims to make the electrical grid better. (UWM Photo/Elora Hennessey)

    UW-Milwaukee (UWM) has joined a federally funded partnership of universities and companies working to make the U.S. electrical grid more reliable, greener and less expensive. The university on Thursday announced its membership in a National Science Foundation-backed research center called “Grid-connected Advanced Power Electronic Systems,” or GRAPES. The center partners with industry to develop new

  3. UW-Stout Student Power: Solar panels to provide energy for first time on campus building

    Future installation of 36 solar panels on the rooftop of a UW-Stout building began with approval of a Stout Student Association Sustainability Council recommendation. Shown in front of Merle M. Price Commons, where the panels will be installed, are: front row, left to right, council adviser Sarah Rykal, council members Laura Donovan and Kennedy Crever; back row, council members Ben Ritter, Jared Allen and Maggie Thesing.

    Menomonie, Wis. — Driven by students’ perseverance to build on campus sustainability, University of Wisconsin–Stout will tap the sun to partially power a campus building. A proposal to install 36 solar panels on top of Merle M. Price Commons recently was approved by the Stout Student Association, the university’s student government council. Since receiving state

  4. Blugolds build inexpensive, efficient solar-powered water heater

    Dr. Kim Pierson, UW-Eau Claire professor of physics, discusses a solar-powered water heater he is developing with research students Brendon Kwick, Sawyer Buck and Hunter Hermes.

    When Dr. Kim Pierson began teaching a new class about renewable energies, he used some inexpensive materials he found at a local store to build a small model of a solar thermal water heater that he could use in his laboratory. The UW-Eau Claire physics professor quickly realized that his model — if built to

  5. UW-La Crosse: Campus reduces energy consumption, saves money, receives worldwide award

    Centennial Hall is one of several buildings at UW-La Crosse that was built to green building certification standards, Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design. UWL’s commitment to green building design and energy efficient updates across campus have resulted in lower energy use and budget savings.

    UW-La Crosse’s energy consumption in 2015 was 12.7 percent lower than a decade ago. That’s according to a Wisconsin Department of Administration report that summarizes annual energy use in all state facilities. The report sets fiscal year 2005 as a baseline and makes adjustments for weather and total campus square footage. Because of UWL’s dedication

  6. UW-Milwaukee: A wrench fends off injury, feeds the economy

    The gas meters that measure energy consumption in buildings pose as great a threat to workers who service them as downed power lines do to electric utility workers. Left in place for decades, the meters are often painted over and rusted, making nuts difficult to budge. Heavy pipe wrenches can slip when workers apply excessive

  7. UW-Milwaukee: Building a better way to supply energy

    It wasn’t a natural disaster or high demand that caused an electrical blackout in the northeastern United States in summer 2003. A high-voltage power line in Ohio brushed against overgrown trees, causing it to shut down, and touching off a domino effect of disabled lines. For the next two days, 50 million people in eight

  8. VIDEO: UWO, partners cut ribbon for Rosendale Dairy biodigester

    ribbon cutting ceremony

    Temperatures in the single digits didn’t faze University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and UW Oshkosh Foundation leaders and project partners from cutting the ribbon on a new, 1.4 megawatt biodigester at Rosendale Dairy in Pickett on Dec. 11. About 100 guests — project partners and supporters — gathered at the state’s largest dairy farm to inaugurate

  9. A CALS-trained teacher brings bioenergy research into high school classrooms

    science teacher in the lab

    As students in Craig Kohn’s class at Waterford Union High School can tell you, you don’t need a grant or Ph.D. to do scientific research. A question and some curiosity are all that’s needed—along with a sturdy pair of gloves. Kohn BS’08, who earned degrees in biology and agricultural education at UW-Madison’s College of Agricultural

  10. Wisconsin’s “Brown Gold” Rush: Transforming manure to energy in America’s Dairyland

    scientists working in a lab

    Earth’s petroleum stores are dwindling, but a Wisconsin project aims to produce energy from a resource that’s in little danger of running low: cow manure, or “brown gold.” The University of Wisconsin–Madison and several state companies, funded by a $7 million grant from the USDA Biomass Research and Development Initiative (BRDI), have partnered to pilot the conversion