1. Research buzz: UW-Stout professor, students identify bacterium that may kill honey bees

    Jim Burritt, associate professor of biology, is photographed Tuesday, July 7, 2015 in a biotechnology lab in Jarvis Hall, while working with students and lab assistants on his two-year bee study project, "Honey Bee Hemocyte Profiling by Flow Cytometry". Burritt is trying to help figure out the problem known as hive winter kill, which is threatening the honeybee industry and possibly even the species itself. (UW-Stout photo by Brett T. Roseman)

    Menomonie, Wis. — A University of Wisconsin-Stout biology professor and his students may have made an important discovery in the effort to determine why honey bee hives are dying out during the winters in the Upper Midwest. Biology Professor Jim Burritt and his students have published research about a new strain of the bacterium called

  2. Market Advice: UW-Stout dietetics student encourages healthy eating with Veggin’ Out program

    UW-Stout dietetics student Amanda Nass offers zucchini dessert squares at the Veggin’ Out booth at the Downtown Farmers’ Market in Eau Claire.

    Menomonie, Wis. — University of Wisconsin-Stout undergraduate student Amanda Nass is motivated to eat healthy food, including local vegetables, and wants to educate others to do the same. Since June, Nass has been volunteering two days a week with the Veggin’ Out program through the Eau Claire City-County Health Department. The program promotes farmers’ markets

  3. UW-Madison horticulturalists help sow seeds of community in northern Wisconsin

    CALS horticulturalists help sow seeds of community in northern Wisconsin

    Just as some seeds yield tomatoes, carrots and lettuce, others grow community and partnership. In a greenhouse in the northern Wisconsin town of Park Falls, all of those seeds are taking root with the help of UW-Madison’s College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS) horticulture graduate student Michael Geiger, horticulture professor Sara Patterson and a

  4. UW-Milwaukee’s green roofs provide important habitat for bees

    Research done by Conservation and Environmental Science majors Amanda Pastirik, left, and Meghan Wersel shows UWM’s green roofs provide important habitat for bees. (UWM Photo/Troye Fox)

    UWM was abuzz this summer – especially on campus roofs. That’s where Conservation and Environmental Science majors Amanda Pastirik and Meghan Wersel spent much of their break, laying the groundwork for a long-term research project on the presence of pollinators – specifically honeybees and bumblebees – on the university’s green roofs. “There’s a lot of

  5. UW-Stout engineering a solution: National grant to track outcomes of Nicaraguan village project

    UW-Stout student Trevor Sobtzak, left, takes GPS coordinates outside a home in Las Macias as Marling Garcia, center, and Anyel Garcia watch.

    Menomonie, Wis. — In Las Macias, Nicaragua, fresh water isn’t taken for granted. Each day, women and girls walk a half-mile or more one way on a steep, rocky path to a well and return home balancing five-gallon buckets of the precious resource on their heads. They make the trip seven to 10 times a

  6. Learning by growing: Students dig into sustainability at UW-Sprout Campus Garden

    The UW-Sprout CSA Campus Garden is photographed Wednesday, July 29, 2015. Pictured is Brianna Shea, a environmental science sophomore from Hartford, WI, harvesting parsley. (UW-Stout photo by Brett T. Roseman)

    Menomonie, Wis. — On a recent summer morning, sun shining, University of Wisconsin-Stout students picked cucumbers, patty pan summer squash, dragon tongue bush beans, parsley and other items from a well-tended row garden on north campus. After washing the vegetables and herbs in basins filled with water, three students loaded the day’s bounty into coolers,

  7. Profile of UW-River Falls First-Generation Student: Matt Pechacek

    Profile of UW-River Falls First-Generation Student: Matt Pechacek

    Matt Pechacek is a first-generation student at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls.

  8. Interviews with UW-River Falls team conducting bee research

    UW-River Falls Biology Professors Brad and Kim Mogen lead a team of students in many projects studying various aspects of bees over the course of the summer.

  9. UW-Milwaukee provides a tasty treat for fish-eating zoo animals: live prey

    A bear at the Milwaukee County Zoo dines on fish raised by aquaculture researchers at UWM. (UWM Photo by Derek Rickert)

    Fred Binkowski raises tens of thousands of yellow perch each year in a lab at UW-Milwaukee’s School of Freshwater Sciences, as he researches ways to improve methods of raising fish, called aquaculture. Binkowski has been hugely successful in figuring out how to make aquaculture more profitable and sustainable. But the fish he raises also are

  10. UW-River Falls testing a regional sustainable beekeeping model

    Honey Collection

    Researchers in the Biology Department at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls recently received funding from the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection to test a honey bee management strategy targeted towards maintaining and increasing the number of non-migratory Wisconsin beekeepers. Wisconsin beekeepers produce almost 4.5 million pounds of honey with an estimated value