1. Students in UW-Stout LAKES program present research in Menomonie, Chetek

    Photo of UW-Stout biology instructor Arthur Kneeland, left, working with LAKES REU students Elise Martinez, center, and Sarah Mack in a university lab. They are growing corn and other plants in sediment taken from a local waterway.

    Menomonie, Wis. — New studies on the Red Cedar River watershed, including Lake Menomin, Tainter Lake and the Chetek chain of lakes, were presented in forums in Menomonie and Chetek in early August. Thirteen university students from around the U.S. explained their summer research to the public at the Raw Deal restaurant in Menomonie and

  2. Positive STEPS: Andersen engineering manager, UW-Stout ’02 grad, sets example for girls

    Kari Berthiaume helps STEPS for Girls participants with their robot projects in an engineering lab at UW-Stout.

    Menomonie, Wis. — As a group of 10 girls in teal T-shirts assembled robots in a University of Wisconsin-Stout lab, Kari Berthiaume thought back to when she was in middle school. “I wish I had the opportunity to do something like this when I was that age. It’s a key time for them to explore

  3. UW-Stout classes mentor middle-schoolers at Ojibwe School in Hayward

    UW-Stout student Skylar Kitchner leads a career and education development activity with LCO sixth-graders.

    Stepping into classrooms at the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe School in Hayward this spring and seeing bright, eager-to-learn children brought back many childhood memories for Noelle Metoxen. “It reminded me of my grade school with the small classes, like how I grew up in tribal school,” said Metoxen, a member of the Oneida tribe who

  4. UW-Stout food packaging, virtual reality projects earn state recognition

    UW-Stout graduate student Pratigya Thapaliya presented research at the WiSys innovation symposium on creating antimicrobial packaging for cheese.

    Menomonie, Wis. — Two projects with very different research goals — one to inhibit mold growth on packaged cheese and the other to create a virtual reality experience with art — have brought state recognition to University of Wisconsin-Stout students. At the WiSys annual innovation symposium, WSTS, held in July at UW-Platteville, graduate student Pratigya

  5. Print ready: UW-Stout students, staff help Boy Scouts earn graphic arts merit badges

    Students in the Graphic Communications major worked with multiple boy scout troops in the labs within the Communication Technologies building. On this day, the boy scouts created books from start to finish, and screen printed their own t-shirts. The boy scouts all earned their Graphic Arts Merit Badge for participating and completing the projects. The event took place at UW-Stout on Monday, March 20, 2017.

    Menomonie, Wis. — A group of young men recently inched closer to living out the imperative that guides them and has guided other young men like them for more than a century: be prepared. The Chippewa Valley Council of the Boy Scouts of America brought 13 boys from seven troops to University of Wisconsin-Stout’s graphic

  6. UW-Stout student lands foster care internship in Washington, D.C.

    UW-Stout human development and family studies student Tonisha Hora has been chosen to work with a federal legislator on child welfare policies during an internship this summer.

    Menomonie, Wis. — Ever since she arrived at University of Wisconsin-Stout, Tonisha Hora has supported other students who have lived in foster homes. This summer she will get the chance to make a nationwide impact on issues affecting children in foster care. Hora, a senior, has been selected by the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute

  7. New UW-Stout academic certificate helps graduates further social work careers; online/hybrid delivery increases access for rural area workers

    Amy White, intake and assessment social worker for the Dunn County Aging and Disability Resource Center, is pursuing UW-Stout’s new social work professional certificate. The certificate qualifies graduates for social work certification in Wisconsin.

    Menomonie, Wis. — As a social worker for a smaller county human services agency in northern Wisconsin, Rachel Obiden must be prepared to handle any case that comes her way. A newly earned professional certificate from UW-Stout provides her with additional skills and the ability to become certified as a social worker in Wisconsin. Obiden

  8. Dedicated to serving students: Longtime UW-Stout hospitality professor honored by national organization

    Phil McGuirk, a professor in UW-Stout’s School of Hospitality Leadership.

    Menomonie, Wis. — Professor Phil McGuirk was in his element in February when the Club Managers Association of America kicked off its annual conference in Orlando. He was surrounded by 30 of his University of Wisconsin-Stout School of Hospitality Leadership students, who had held fundraisers and paid their way to attend. Also in attendance were

  9. UW-Stout Student Power: Solar panels to provide energy for first time on campus building

    Future installation of 36 solar panels on the rooftop of a UW-Stout building began with approval of a Stout Student Association Sustainability Council recommendation. Shown in front of Merle M. Price Commons, where the panels will be installed, are: front row, left to right, council adviser Sarah Rykal, council members Laura Donovan and Kennedy Crever; back row, council members Ben Ritter, Jared Allen and Maggie Thesing.

    Menomonie, Wis. — Driven by students’ perseverance to build on campus sustainability, University of Wisconsin–Stout will tap the sun to partially power a campus building. A proposal to install 36 solar panels on top of Merle M. Price Commons recently was approved by the Stout Student Association, the university’s student government council. Since receiving state

  10. Research buzz: UW-Stout professor, students identify bacterium that may kill honey bees

    Jim Burritt, associate professor of biology, is photographed Tuesday, July 7, 2015 in a biotechnology lab in Jarvis Hall, while working with students and lab assistants on his two-year bee study project, "Honey Bee Hemocyte Profiling by Flow Cytometry". Burritt is trying to help figure out the problem known as hive winter kill, which is threatening the honeybee industry and possibly even the species itself. (UW-Stout photo by Brett T. Roseman)

    Menomonie, Wis. — A University of Wisconsin-Stout biology professor and his students may have made an important discovery in the effort to determine why honey bee hives are dying out during the winters in the Upper Midwest. Biology Professor Jim Burritt and his students have published research about a new strain of the bacterium called