1. UW-Milwaukee water program links students to careers

    Anuja Patel, a student at Gateway Technical College, works in the lab at UWM's School of Freshwater Sciences. Research in the lab is part of the Water SYS-STEM internship. (IWM Photo/Derek Rickert)

    Krista Vanderwerff was working on a degree in mechanical engineering at Waukesha County Technical College, but she had never heard of possibilities in the growing water industry. Now she’s done internships at Graef Engineering Consultants and Evoqua Water Technologies in Waukesha and is planning to come to UW-Milwaukee (UWM) for an advanced degree. Tommy Thor,

  2. UW-Milwaukee develops smart buoy to monitor area beaches

    A new buoy built by UW-Milwaukee researchers will improve water-quality warnings and help Milwaukee’s health department better monitor conditions at city beaches. Faculty members Todd Miller and Matthew Smith, along with post-doctoral fellow Lucas Beversdorf, constructed the buoy at the School of Freshwater Sciences to gather minute-by-minute information about conditions around Bradford Beach and transmit

  3. UW-Milwaukee undergraduate research leads to parental advice

    Undergraduate psychology student Haley Branback presented her research on the effects of parental criticism at UW-Milwaukee’s Undergraduate Research Symposium. (Photo courtesy of Haley Branback)

    Parents, if you don’t want your child to take life too seriously, lay off criticizing them. That’s the conclusion psychology major Haley Branback reached as a result of her research examining how parental expectations and criticisms affect their children’s sense of responsibility later in life. She gave a poster presentation on her project at UW-Milwaukee’s

  4. UW-Milwaukee microbiologist leads Lake Michigan’s cleanup crew

    Bradford Beach is enjoying a new day in the sun after aggressive cleanup and naturalization efforts improved water quality and boosted overall beach health. (UWM Photo/Derek Rickert)

    Lake Michigan was one of the things that drew Sandra McLellan back to her hometown in 1998, and she made a point of taking her son to the beach. Often. But the beach had changed since her childhood. Beautiful Bradford Beach on Milwaukee’s east side was contaminated by E. coli. At South Shore Beach, runoff

  5. UW-Milwaukee: A wrench fends off injury, feeds the economy

    The gas meters that measure energy consumption in buildings pose as great a threat to workers who service them as downed power lines do to electric utility workers. Left in place for decades, the meters are often painted over and rusted, making nuts difficult to budge. Heavy pipe wrenches can slip when workers apply excessive

  6. UW-Milwaukee physicist develops new diagnostic tools for prostate cancer

    UWM Physicist Sarah Patch and undergraduate research assistant Yazeed Qadadha use a "souped-up" FM radio transmitter to generate high-frequency pulses that can be detected with ultrasound transducers. They're using the technology to build 3D images of prostates in hopes of detecting cancer. (UWM Photo/Derek Rickert)

    Milwaukee — Cancer diagnosis has come a long way, with noninvasive diagnostic imaging largely replacing exploratory surgery. At UWM, physicist Sarah Patch is working on the next generation of diagnostic tools: thermoacoustic imaging. “I intentionally heat up an object a little bit, and it wants to expand because it’s heating up, so it generates an

  7. UW-Milwaukee: Building a better way to supply energy

    It wasn’t a natural disaster or high demand that caused an electrical blackout in the northeastern United States in summer 2003. A high-voltage power line in Ohio brushed against overgrown trees, causing it to shut down, and touching off a domino effect of disabled lines. For the next two days, 50 million people in eight

  8. Would-be entrepreneur gets training she needs at UW-Milwaukee

    While running child care centers owned by others, Tammy Imme often dreamed of owning her own business, but it wasn’t until her husband lost his job that the New Berlin resident decided to take the plunge. “That was the moment where we decided to do something bigger,” Imme said. Working for a large, national chain

  9. UW-Milwaukee’s green roofs provide important habitat for bees

    Research done by Conservation and Environmental Science majors Amanda Pastirik, left, and Meghan Wersel shows UWM’s green roofs provide important habitat for bees. (UWM Photo/Troye Fox)

    UWM was abuzz this summer – especially on campus roofs. That’s where Conservation and Environmental Science majors Amanda Pastirik and Meghan Wersel spent much of their break, laying the groundwork for a long-term research project on the presence of pollinators – specifically honeybees and bumblebees – on the university’s green roofs. “There’s a lot of

  10. Labor relations ‘get real’ in this unique UW-Milwaukee program

    In the case of the School of Continuing Education’s Labor Relations Management certificate – those who can, also teach. And what they teach, it turns out, can’t be taught by many. “In addition to being one of the few schools in the country to offer labor relations in continuing education, we are the only one