1. Students in UW-Stout LAKES program present research in Menomonie, Chetek

    Photo of UW-Stout biology instructor Arthur Kneeland, left, working with LAKES REU students Elise Martinez, center, and Sarah Mack in a university lab. They are growing corn and other plants in sediment taken from a local waterway.

    Menomonie, Wis. — New studies on the Red Cedar River watershed, including Lake Menomin, Tainter Lake and the Chetek chain of lakes, were presented in forums in Menomonie and Chetek in early August. Thirteen university students from around the U.S. explained their summer research to the public at the Raw Deal restaurant in Menomonie and

  2. High-flying fieldwork: UW-La Crosse researchers use drone technology to help combat invasive wetland plant

    Photo of UW-La Crosse student Zachary Woodcock, left, who earned a summer research grant to use drones to conduct aerial surveys of purple loosestrife, an aquatic invasive plant with help from UWL faculty mentor and remote sensing scientist, Niti Mishra, right. Here Woodcock takes a drone survey test flight at the La Crosse River Delta near Bangor, Wisconsin.

    For more than a decade, members of the Brice Prairie Conservation Association have been releasing beetles to control the spread of an invasive flowering plant that is degrading regional wetlands and with them, wildlife habitat. The BPCA is attempting to stop Purple Loosestrife across selected areas of Brice Prairie and the Lake Onalaska area, in

  3. UW-La Crosse community partnership turns 47,000 pounds of food waste into fertilizer

    On a recent Friday afternoon, UW-La Crosse (UWL) senior Jeremy Shimetz loaded six, five- gallon buckets filled of food waste into his 2003 Hyundai Sonata. His destination: 921 Ferry St., La Crosse — the home of a massive amount of hungry worms. Shimetz dumped loads of egg shells, vegetable shavings and fruit peelings into a

  4. UW-La Crosse professor, student bring ancient culture into modern times

    UWL associate professor of archaeology and a student working together at a computer

    Engravings of potentially the world’s earliest writing. A bust of one of the most famous women of the ancient world. Mummified bodies from northern Europe’s Iron Age. These artifacts preserved in museums across the world are not easily transported to a UW-La Crosse archaeology classroom. Yet David Anderson’s students pass them around to get a

  5. UW-La Crosse scientists, students begin new experiment to bring back the forests

    UW-La Crosse Professor Meredith Thomsen plants a tree in an open field with help from a graduate student

    On a highway south of La Crescent, Minnesota, a sea of grass waves in the spring breeze. The open landscape is a stark contrast to the forest that once grew here along Hwy. 26.  More than 100 years ago, the Upper Mississippi River Valley floodplain supported diverse native plants and trees — the perfect habitat

  6. Expert movers: UW-La Crosse students help fill local health gaps

    UWL graduate student Elizabeth Skaer helps lead a free fitness program for Summit Elementary School staff. The program is one of many community health and wellness programs led by UWL Physical Therapy students this semester.

    La Crosse, Wis.—UW-La Crosse (UWL) graduate student Elizabeth Skaer yells “Go!” and the gym is a wave of motion. Fluorescent lights beat down as Summit Elementary School staff members begin high stepping, jumping rope and crunching into sit ups. Special Education teacher Kasey Pomeroy is panting, but smiling. She wears a hot pink tank top

  7. Got science? UW-La Crosse’s special career fair is just the formula for needed scientists

    La Crosse, Wis. — A special career fair for UW-La Crosse College of Science and Health majors is creating the right mixture for students thinking about careers in science. And, it’s helping statewide organizations seeking scientists share the many science-related opportunities available throughout the region. In February, the Science Career Forum was held for the

  8. UW-La Crosse biochemistry program earns high review as workforce demand increases

    Zoey Good, undergraduate biochemistry major, with John May, assistant Professor, Department Chemistry & Biochemistry in CHM 419: Advanced Biochemistry Lab. A research-embedded experience within this lab is just one of the impressive parts of UWL’s Biochemistry curriculum which helped it earn national accreditation in January.

    UWL’s biochemistry major has received national accreditation at a time when demand for biochemists in Wisconsin is on the rise. The Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development reports growth in biochemistry and biophysics-related employment at the top of chemistry-related occupations. The field is also ranked No. 11 on a list of Wisconsin’s top 25 highest-growth occupations requiring a

  9. UW-La Crosse: Campus reduces energy consumption, saves money, receives worldwide award

    Centennial Hall is one of several buildings at UW-La Crosse that was built to green building certification standards, Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design. UWL’s commitment to green building design and energy efficient updates across campus have resulted in lower energy use and budget savings.

    UW-La Crosse’s energy consumption in 2015 was 12.7 percent lower than a decade ago. That’s according to a Wisconsin Department of Administration report that summarizes annual energy use in all state facilities. The report sets fiscal year 2005 as a baseline and makes adjustments for weather and total campus square footage. Because of UWL’s dedication

  10. UW-La Crosse professor earns Innovator of the Year award for green chemistry contributions

    Robert McGaff, professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, received the Innovator of the Year Award from WiSys Technology Foundation. Here he is pictured in the lab with Rachel Butler, one of his student research assistants.

    Mother Nature isn’t the only one happy about UW-La Crosse Professor Robert McGaff’s innovations in green chemistry. McGaff, Chemistry and Biochemistry, received the Innovator of the Year Award from WiSys Technology Foundation for his research that is making Earth-friendly chemistry more commercially viable. The inaugural award goes to just one innovator each year from the 11