1. UW-Platteville USDA grant will support dairy cattle grazing research

    UW-Platteville has been awarded a $300,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture. The three-year grant is part of the Capacity Building Grants for Non-Land Grant Colleges of Agriculture Program. The funding will support the construction of infrastructure necessary to conduct research on grazing-based dairy production systems at Pioneer

  2. UW-River Falls student innovator helps paraplegic horseback riders

    UW-River Falls student innovator Shanna Burris helps paraplegic horseback riders

    WiSys Innovator and UW-River Falls student Shanna Burris set out to make horseback riding more accessible, specifically for paraplegic riders. The McNair Scholar and equine management major created a hoist that can lift a saddle onto a horse, an obstacle she learned has not been addressed through a survey of paraplegic riders. WiSys accepted Burris’

  3. UW-La Crosse: Campus reduces energy consumption, saves money, receives worldwide award

    Centennial Hall is one of several buildings at UW-La Crosse that was built to green building certification standards, Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design. UWL’s commitment to green building design and energy efficient updates across campus have resulted in lower energy use and budget savings.

    UW-La Crosse’s energy consumption in 2015 was 12.7 percent lower than a decade ago. That’s according to a Wisconsin Department of Administration report that summarizes annual energy use in all state facilities. The report sets fiscal year 2005 as a baseline and makes adjustments for weather and total campus square footage. Because of UWL’s dedication

  4. Research buzz: UW-Stout professor, students identify bacterium that may kill honey bees

    Jim Burritt, associate professor of biology, is photographed Tuesday, July 7, 2015 in a biotechnology lab in Jarvis Hall, while working with students and lab assistants on his two-year bee study project, "Honey Bee Hemocyte Profiling by Flow Cytometry". Burritt is trying to help figure out the problem known as hive winter kill, which is threatening the honeybee industry and possibly even the species itself. (UW-Stout photo by Brett T. Roseman)

    Menomonie, Wis. — A University of Wisconsin-Stout biology professor and his students may have made an important discovery in the effort to determine why honey bee hives are dying out during the winters in the Upper Midwest. Biology Professor Jim Burritt and his students have published research about a new strain of the bacterium called