1. Technology entrepreneurs call iCorps experience life-changing

    technology entrepreneaurs in a computer lab

    The Center for Technology Commercialization (CTC) recently wrapped up its second consecutive year of mentoring a team from UW-Madison through the National Science Foundation Innovation Corps (iCorps) program, an intensive seven-week program created in 2012 to improve the commercial successes of NSF-funded technology and to expedite the start-up process. iCorps provides each competitively assembled team

  2. Industrial design students shine in national competitions

    products engineered by UW-Stout students

    Industrial design students from University of Wisconsin-Stout have shown that they rank among the best in the country by taking first, second and third places in two national competitions. Students competed in the Interzinc Student Design Competition and the FreeTech Plastics Student Thermoformed Part Competition. Students in both competitions were in classes taught by Ben

  3. UW-Baraboo Sauk County students build skills, community through Habitat project

    female student insulating a basement

    Student volunteers built more than a house on Saturday, October 19. They also developed camaraderie, community connections, and an appreciation for service. A crew of 15 students from two University of Wisconsin-Baraboo/Sauk County groups – the men’s basketball team and the Rotaract Club – spent the day on a Habitat for Humanity construction site in

  4. UW-Eau Claire biology researchers study deer ticks and the bacteria that causes Lyme disease

    students working in the lab

    EAU CLAIRE — Dr. Lloyd Turtinen, professor of biology at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, turned one encounter with a tick into a five-year faculty-student research project that examined the prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi (the causative bacterial agent and insect vector of Lyme disease) in Ixodes scapularis (the deer tick). The research findings follow a

  5. UW-La Crosse: An international leader in mercury pollution research

    It affects wallets, the environment, nutrition and the health of people — especially the developing fetus. Mercury pollution is a serious problem for Wisconsin, the Upper Midwest and the Nation. That’s why UW-La Crosse scientists have been studying it in lakes and rivers of the Upper Midwest for decades, contributing to the weight of evidence

  6. UW-Whitewater alumna: Supplying industry through chemistry

    engineers working in a lab

      After fleeing her native country of Vietnam, Nicki Vo found a home in Whitewater and university mentors who challenged her to achieve her dreams. She’s now an talented chemist, supplying products for industries across Wisconsin and beyond.