1. UW-La Crosse Biochemistry program earns high review as workforce demand increases

    Zoey Good, undergraduate biochemistry major, with John May, assistant Professor, Department Chemistry & Biochemistry in CHM 419: Advanced Biochemistry Lab. A research-embedded experience within this lab is just one of the impressive parts of UWL’s Biochemistry curriculum which helped it earn national accreditation in January.

    UWL’s biochemistry major has received national accreditation at a time when demand for biochemists in Wisconsin is on the rise. The Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development reports growth in biochemistry and biophysics-related employment at the top of chemistry-related occupations. The field is also ranked No. 11 on a list of Wisconsin’s top 25 highest-growth occupations requiring a

  2. UW-Stout Student Power: Solar panels to provide energy for first time on campus building

    Future installation of 36 solar panels on the rooftop of a UW-Stout building began with approval of a Stout Student Association Sustainability Council recommendation. Shown in front of Merle M. Price Commons, where the panels will be installed, are: front row, left to right, council adviser Sarah Rykal, council members Laura Donovan and Kennedy Crever; back row, council members Ben Ritter, Jared Allen and Maggie Thesing.

    Menomonie, Wis. — Driven by students’ perseverance to build on campus sustainability, University of Wisconsin–Stout will tap the sun to partially power a campus building. A proposal to install 36 solar panels on top of Merle M. Price Commons recently was approved by the Stout Student Association, the university’s student government council. Since receiving state

  3. UW-Platteville USDA grant will support dairy cattle grazing research

    UW-Platteville has been awarded a $300,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture. The three-year grant is part of the Capacity Building Grants for Non-Land Grant Colleges of Agriculture Program. The funding will support the construction of infrastructure necessary to conduct research on grazing-based dairy production systems at Pioneer

  4. UW-River Falls student innovator helps paraplegic horseback riders

    UW-River Falls student innovator Shanna Burris helps paraplegic horseback riders

    WiSys Innovator and UW-River Falls student Shanna Burris set out to make horseback riding more accessible, specifically for paraplegic riders. The McNair Scholar and equine management major created a hoist that can lift a saddle onto a horse, an obstacle she learned has not been addressed through a survey of paraplegic riders. WiSys accepted Burris’

  5. UW-La Crosse: Campus reduces energy consumption, saves money, receives worldwide award

    Centennial Hall is one of several buildings at UW-La Crosse that was built to green building certification standards, Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design. UWL’s commitment to green building design and energy efficient updates across campus have resulted in lower energy use and budget savings.

    UW-La Crosse’s energy consumption in 2015 was 12.7 percent lower than a decade ago. That’s according to a Wisconsin Department of Administration report that summarizes annual energy use in all state facilities. The report sets fiscal year 2005 as a baseline and makes adjustments for weather and total campus square footage. Because of UWL’s dedication

  6. Research buzz: UW-Stout professor, students identify bacterium that may kill honey bees

    Jim Burritt, associate professor of biology, is photographed Tuesday, July 7, 2015 in a biotechnology lab in Jarvis Hall, while working with students and lab assistants on his two-year bee study project, "Honey Bee Hemocyte Profiling by Flow Cytometry". Burritt is trying to help figure out the problem known as hive winter kill, which is threatening the honeybee industry and possibly even the species itself. (UW-Stout photo by Brett T. Roseman)

    Menomonie, Wis. — A University of Wisconsin-Stout biology professor and his students may have made an important discovery in the effort to determine why honey bee hives are dying out during the winters in the Upper Midwest. Biology Professor Jim Burritt and his students have published research about a new strain of the bacterium called

  7. UW-Whitewater: Aspiring teachers bond through personal challenges, excitement for education

    UW-Whitewater students Rocio Aburto, left, and Adelaida Sisk work together in the "Non-Trad Pad" for nontraditional students in the University Center on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016.

    Adelaida Sisk looks across the table as she has coffee with mentee and friend Rocio Aburto. She can’t help but smile. Maybe it’s the glasses, short, curly hair or her obvious excitement for education. Sisk feels as if she is looking at a younger version of herself. As mothers, Latinas, paraprofessionals and aspiring teachers, the

  8. UW-La Crosse professor earns Innovator of the Year award for green chemistry contributions

    Robert McGaff, professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, received the Innovator of the Year Award from WiSys Technology Foundation. Here he is pictured in the lab with Rachel Butler, one of his student research assistants.

    Mother Nature isn’t the only one happy about UW-La Crosse Professor Robert McGaff’s innovations in green chemistry. McGaff, Chemistry and Biochemistry, received the Innovator of the Year Award from WiSys Technology Foundation for his research that is making Earth-friendly chemistry more commercially viable. The inaugural award goes to just one innovator each year from the 11

  9. Anne Basting named UW-Milwaukee’s first MacArthur ‘genius’

    Theater professor Anne Basting has been named a 2016 MacArthur Fellow, making her the first UWM faculty member to earn the esteemed MacArthur Foundation’s highest honor. Basting, 51, was one of 23 new fellows announced by the foundation late Wednesday night, and each will receive $625,000 to pursue whatever projects they desire. The unrestricted fellowships,

  10. Power tap: UW-Stout research, tenacity could bring electricity to more Malawi homes

    UW-Stout Professor Tom Lacksonen and Hastings Mkwandwire, a resident of Mzuzu, Malawi, observe one of Mkwandwire’s hand-built hydroelectric generators under a metal covering.

    Electricity could become a reality for more homes in a city in northern Malawi, Africa, because of a University of Wisconsin-Stout professor’s research and resourceful students’ problem-solving skills. Tom Lacksonen, an operations and management professor, traveled to the mountainous city of Mzuzu in January with manufacturing engineering and computer engineering student Josh Miller. Their mission: