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Faculty College 2007; May 29-June 1, 2007; UW-Richland, Richland Center, Wisconsin
 
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2007 Program / Workshops / Schedule

Faculty College 2007 brochure (pdf)
 

   

 
Program

 

 

Keynote Address:
Taking the Lead on What Matters in College:
Liberal Education for the New Global Century

by Carol Geary Schneider, President of the Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Seminars:
Achievement, Equity and Retention:
Three Pedagogical Changes that Can Make a Real Difference in ANY College Classroom

by Craig E. Nelson, Carnegie Scholar since 2000 and Professor Emeritus of Biology at Indiana University (IU) in Bloomington;

Creativity in the Classroom:
Making Space for Inspiration

by Katherine Sanders, corporate consultant and specialist in faculty development, currently based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania but formerly of UW-Madison;

Gathering SoTL Evidence: Methods for Systematic Inquiry into Student Learning
by Renee A. Meyers, Coordinator of the UW System Leadership Site for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), and Professor of Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; and

How will they be different at the end of the semester? Aligning student learning with course objectives
by Jennifer Meta Robinson, director of Campus Instructional Consulting and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Program at Indiana University.

 

   

 
Carol Geary
Schneider

 

 

Keynote Address:
Taking the Lead on What Matters in College:
Liberal Education for the New Global Century

Carol Geary Schneider is President of the Association of American Colleges and Universities. With 1,100 institutional members, AAC&U is the leading national organization devoted to advancing and strengthening undergraduate liberal education. Under her leadership, AAC&U launched “Liberal Education and America’s Promise” (LEAP), a ten-year public advocacy and campus action initiative designed to engage students and the public with what really matters in a college education for the twenty-first century.

While a vice president at AAC&U in the 1990’s, Dr. Schneider headed a major initiative at AAC&U on higher education and U.S. pluralism “American Commitments: Diversity, Democracy and Liberal Learning.” Dr. Schneider has published extensively and has taught at the University of Chicago, DePaul University, Chicago State University, and Boston University. Dr. Schneider is a graduate of Mount Holyoke College with a bachelor's degree in history (Magna Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa). She studied at the University of London's Institute for Historical Research and earned the Ph.D. in history from Harvard University.

 
   

 
Craig E.
Nelson

 

 

Seminar:
Achievement, Equity and Retention:
Three Pedagogical Changes that Can Make a Real Difference in ANY College Classroom

When diversity issues are cast in content-centered ways, many faculty may view them as irrelevant to their own teaching. However, examination of pedagogical practices reveals a need for major changes in nearly all courses. We will examine at least three types of pedagogical changes that can make a real difference in achievement and retention in almost any college or university classroom.

Specific topics will include:

  • How can I radically reduce or eliminate low grades in lecture courses without lowering standards?
  • How can I make my students brighter and harder working using only 1 hour of class time (in ways that level the playing field for all groups)?
  • Does my assessment system unfairly and unnecessarily favor particular groups?

Throughout we will ask what else we can do to increase achievement and fairness.

Processes:
Brief lectures alternating with writing and discussions of applications to your own teaching.

Craig E. Nelson is Professor Emeritus of Biology at Indiana University (IU) in Bloomington, where he has been since 1966. His biological research has been on evolution and ecology. In addition to several courses in biology, he taught intensive freshman seminars, great books and other honors courses, several collaboratively-taught interdisciplinary courses, and regularly taught a graduate course on "Alternative Approaches to Teaching College Biology." His articles on teaching address critical thinking and mature valuing, diversity, active learning, teaching evolution, and the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). He has presented numerous invited workshops on these and related topics. He was founding Director of Environmental Programs in IU's School of Public and Environmental Affairs and instrumental in the development of IU's award-winning SoTL program (www.indiana.edu/~sotl/). He has received several awards for distinguished teaching from IU, including the President's Medal for Excellence, "the highest honor bestowed by Indiana University," in 2001, as well as nationally competitive awards from Vanderbilt and Northwestern. He has been a Carnegie Scholar since 2000, and was named the Outstanding Research and Doctoral University Professor of the Year 2000 by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). He retired from teaching in 2004. In 2005-06, he was the founding President of the new International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. He has been a presenter at four previous sessions of our Faculty College.

 

   

 
Katherine
Sanders

 

 

Seminar:
Creativity in the Classroom:
Making Space for Inspiration

What is creativity? What environments, attitudes and activities block it? What environments, attitudes and activities cultivate it? Let's create an environment for ourselves during Faculty College that helps us be creative in designing environments for our students to be creative!

This week we will engage our senses and the arts to help us explore:

  • Ideas about what creativity is and isn't;
  • Visions of a more creative classroom or course;
  • Hopes for our students' creative abilities;
  • What you can do to enrich your creativity in teaching;
  • What you can do to enrich the creative environ ment for your students; and
  • How you might design a classroom experience, or an entire course, to engage creativity (yours and your students').

If you have a practice, piece of artwork, poetry, or music that you find inspirational or particularly connected to your teaching, please consider bringing it (or a photograph of it) with you.

This session will have large group, small group, paired and solitary work. It will also draw on silence, alone and together. We will talk about how we find inspiration and how we translate it into day-to-day teaching. You will have time to work on your own plan and get feedback from participants.

Katherine Sanders, Ph.D., founded and directed a UW-Madison faculty development center, Creating a Collaborative Academic Environment, from 1993-2003. She enjoys teaching and teachers, and loves helping faculty innovate and experiment in the classroom. She has taught undergraduate and graduate students in engineering, was an NSF Visiting Scholar for faculty development, and an active member of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Teaching Academy from 1996 to 2003. She currently lives and works in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania helping corporate professionals find more meaning, balance, and effectiveness in their work.

 

   

 
Renee A.
Meyers

 

 

Seminar:
Gathering SoTL Evidence: Methods for Systematic Inquiry into Student Learning

This hands on, interactive workshop will offer participants an overview of various methods for gathering data (or evidence) when conducting SoTL research. An often encountered puzzle for many instructors engaged in scholarly inquiry into student learning is how to best collect evidence that will answer their SoTL questions. This workshop will overview a variety of methods, and then concentrate more specifically on the particulars of two or three of the methods that best fit participants' SoTL questions. Participants in this workshop should come prepared with a SoTL question for which they plan to gather evidence in the near future. This question should also be submitted to Renee Meyers (meyers@uwm.edu) a month prior to the start of Faculty College (by April 25, 2007) so the workshop content can be tailored to participants' methodological needs.

In this workshop, participants will:

  • Hear a brief overview of various methods appropriate for systematic inquiry into student learning;
  • Acquire more in-depth information on a set of 2-3 methods which are most relevant to participants' SoTL questions;
  • Learn procedures for design and execution of these methods;
  • Discuss the problems likely to be encountered in designing and executing these methods; and
  • Begin to design their own data-gathering instrument or procedure.

Renee A. Meyers is Coordinator of the UW System Leadership Site for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), and Professor of Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM). She received her Ph.D. in Communication from the University of Illinois in 1987. Prior to coming to UWM, she taught at the University of Oklahoma for five years. Her teaching interests include both undergraduate and graduate courses in Group Communication and Organizational Communication. She received a Central States Communication Teaching Award in 1989, and was twice a finalist for the UWM Martine D. Meyer Excellence in Teaching Award. Her research interests include investigating the role of communication in cooperative earning groups, as well as the study of small group decision making and argument. She is widely published, with numerous scholarly refereed articles and book chapters, and has received several grants to support her research. Dr. Meyers also serves on the editorial boards of several communication and SoTL journals. She was recently Chair of the Group Communication Division of the National Communication Association. Currently, she is engaged in developing a "Certificate in Teaching and Learning" for graduate students at UW-Milwaukee.

 

   

 
Jennifer Meta Robinson

 

 

Seminar:
How will they be different at the end of the semester? Aligning student learning with course objectives

"Don't reinvent the wheel," Anthony J. D'Angelo says, "just realign it" (The College Blue Book 1995). This interactive and collaborative seminar invites participants to consider what they most want students to learn during a semester and what adjustments to course activities will support better progress toward those goals. Such aligning of course objectives, class activities, and student outcomes fosters a more efficient and rewarding teaching and learning experience. In this seminar, one-on-one conversations that aid reflection on teaching strategies, group development of strategies for course design, and plenary discussions focused on presentation and review of participants' work will help those who would like to develop, revise, or revitalize a course.

Through a cumulative process that draws on both participants' wisdom of practice and established strategies for course design and assessment, participants will build a coherent plan for teaching a particular course that maximizes student learning as well as a transferable process for the development of other courses. During this three-day workshop, participants will:

  1. Concentrate on one course in which they would like to design, revisit, or reinvigorate learning goals, major assignments, and activities;
  2. Explore through individual and collaborative writing the intellectual challenges of teaching this course;
  3. Collaborate with colleagues to design or revise teaching activities, course structures, and key assignments such that students can demonstrate their movement toward course goals.

Jennifer Meta Robinson directs Campus Instructional Consulting and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Program at Indiana University. In those roles, she supports faculty members individually and in groups as they reflect on their teaching, design innovations, and assess their work for formative and scholarly purposes. She coordinates Indiana University's leadership in the Carnegie Foundation's Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (CASTL) and is a founder and vice president of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. She is the author of articles and book chapters on teaching and scholarship of teaching and learning that focus especially on faculty communities of practice and collaboration. She has presented on these topics and on her literary criticism and folklore scholarship across the country and abroad. A book based on her ethnographic study of farmers' markets is forthcoming in 2007 from Indiana University Press. She is a lecturer in the Department of Communication and Culture.

 

   

 
2007
Preliminary
Schedule

 

 

Tuesday, May 29
1:00 - 4:00

Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Wisconsin Teaching Scholars Luncheon and Orientation Meeting

4:00 - 5:00

Registration

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:00 - 8:30

Welcome and Keynote
by Carol Geary Schneider

 

Wednesday, May 30
7:30 - 8:00

Chinese Exercises

7:30 - 9:00

Breakfast

9:15 - 11:45

Morning Seminars

12:00 - 1:15

Lunch

12:00 - 1:15

Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Scholars Luncheon Meeting

1:30 - 4:00

Afternoon Seminars

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:00 - 8:00

Evening Program TBA

 

Thursday, May 31

7:30 - 8:00

Chinese Exercises

7:30 - 9:00

Breakfast

9:15 - 11:45

Morning Seminars

12:00 - 1:15

Lunch

1:30 - 4:00

Afternoon Seminars

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:00 - 9:00

Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Scholars Meeting

 

Friday, June 1

7:30 - 8:45

Breakfast

9:00 - 10:00

Morning Seminars

10:15 - 11:15

Afternoon Seminars

11:30 - 12:30

Plenary

12:30 - 1:30

Closing Lunch
 

   
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