UW System Clipsheet

February 22, 2012

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UW System

"UW officials will keep an eye on Supreme Court admissions case," Blog, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Feb. 21.

University of Wisconsin System officials say they're monitoring a case the U.S. Supreme Court will consider on affirmative action in university admissions...The UW System uses race as one of several factors it considers in its admissions process. UW officials have argued their policy is consistent with a 2003 Supreme Court ruling that allowed race to remain a factor in admissions...

On Campus

"Campus Connection: Supreme Court to take new look at affirmative action," Capital Times, Feb. 21.

...UW-Madison officials have continually argued all students benefit from a highly diverse student body as it better prepares everyone to thrive in the global marketplace. Besides, they note, the U.S. Supreme Court's 2003 decision in Grutter vs. Bollinger upheld racial considerations in college admissions at the University of Michigan's law school. It appears UW-Madison's "holistic" admissions policy could be in jeopardy, however, if the Supreme Court reverses course in October...

"Polar explorer talks climate change at UW-L," La Crosse Tribune, Feb. 22.

Polar explorer Will Steger doesn't mince words when it comes to global warming. For 45 years, Steger has journeyed to the world's coldest climates. He's seen the changes first-hand, he says. Open water where there should be ice, broken up pieces of the Arctic Ocean clogging the bays of Greenland, ice caps on the move. He shared eyewitness accounts Tuesday with students at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse...

"Polar explorer speaks at UWL," WXOW-TV, Feb. 21.

Students atUWL got a lesson on climate change tonight. Polar explorer Will Steger spoke to students about his first-hand experience with climate change in the Antarctic... (video clip)

"UWSP salaries below average," Stevens Point Journal, Feb. 22.

University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point faculty are looking for ways to use money already on campus to close the gap between their salaries and their peer's salaries. UW System officials have known for years faculty around the system are being paid significantly less than their counterparts at comparable institutions nationwide. But with state support nose-diving, individual campuses are coming up with their own plans to address the issue...

"Campus Connection: Pressure from Nass' office nixes UW-Extension's 'Art in Protest'," Capital Times, Feb. 22.

Artists from around the area say they were looking forward to participating in "Art in Protest," which was being billed by promoters as an opportunity for people to exchange music, images, written works and other art that grew out of the mass protests against Gov. Scott Walker's union-busting legislation introduced last year. But when Rep. Steve Nass, R-Town of La Grange, got wind of the event -- which was being sponsored by UW-Extension's School for Workers -- his office strongly suggested it be called off...

"UW school cancels labor art display," Wisconsin Radio Network, Feb. 22.

A Republican lawmaker who has an often contentious relationship with the University of Wisconsin has gotten the UW's School for Workers to cancel an "Art in Protest" exhibit that had been scheduled for next month. "The problem with it is that it would be funded with taxpayer dollars and that's through the Extension," says Representative Steve Nass, who chairs the Assembly committee on colleges and universities. "If the unions want to fund it, I have no problem with that"...

"Wis. Republican pressures UW School of Workers to cancel labor arts exhibit," The Progessive, Feb. 21.

The University of Wisconsin's School for Workers was planning on hosting an "Art in Protest" festival on campus next month. Now it's been canceled. One Republican lawmaker in Wisconsin, Representative Steve Nass, who has been a longtime thorn in the university's side, was unhappy about the exhibit, and his chief of staff, Mike Mikalsen, gave an earful to the director of the School for Workers last week, suggesting that the exhibit could imperil the school's funding...

"Faculty Senate looks at more potential growth," Royal Purple, Feb. 22.

Change was the theme at last Tuesday's Faculty Senate meeting. The centerpiece of that discussion was the growth agenda performance proposal, which UW System President Kevin Reilly had asked the universities to draft. The proposal is still purely discussion at this point, but its main focus is to increase the number of degrees given by each university. The proposal calls for an increase from 2,297 degrees in 2011-12 to 2,681 degrees in 2025-26 for UW-Whitewater...While it is only speculation at this point, Chancellor Richard Telfer said this issue needs to be addressed...

"UW researchers study yoga as treatment for PTSD," WISC-TV, Feb. 21.

A new treatment program for post-traumatic stress disorder is under way at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that doesn't involve drugs or traditional therapy. Some veterans returning home from Iraq and Afghanistan are finding relief through yoga...

"Student housing proposal may conflict with UW plan," WISC-TV, Feb. 21.

A student housing proposal may conflict with territory claimed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Owners of 202 to 206 North Brooks Street plan to replace the property with a new five-story, 14-unit apartment complex. The land is part of the UW-Madison campus development plan, but the university said the property's cost is too high...

"UW police officer saves student's life during Badgers hockey game Saturday," Wisconsin State Journal, Feb. 21.

A UW-Madison police officer keeping an eye on behavior in the student section during the University of Wisconsin men's hockey game at the Kohl Center on Saturday night may have helped save a student's life...

"UW-Superior mentoring program receives grant," Northland's News Center, Feb. 21.

The UW-Superior mentoring program for middle school students received a grant for more than $90,000 from the Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corporation...

"UW-Stout students mourn Minnesota crash victims," Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Feb. 22.

A half-dozen UW-Stout students living in South Hall were friends with North Dakota State University students killed in a collision Monday about 10 miles west of Alexandria, Minn...

"Wilson appears ready to meet UW-Rock challenges," Editorial, Janesville Gazette, Feb. 18.

...The Gazette Editorial Board met with (Carmen) Wilson this week and found her to be sharp and witty. She started Dec. 1 and has done her homework, getting to know faculty and students, and, like Pillard, building relationships with the community and its leaders...

"United Way honors university," Marshfield News-Herald, Feb. 21.

The University of Wisconsin-Marshfield/Wood County recently was recognized by Marshfield Area United Way as the 2011 Large Business Campaign of the Year...

National

"Justices take up race as a factor in college entry," New York Times, Feb. 21.

In a 2003 decision that the majority said it expected would last for 25 years, the Supreme Court allowed public colleges and universities to take account of race in admission decisions. On Tuesday, the court signaled that it might end such affirmative action much sooner than that...

"Colleges worry that court could make diversity harder to maintain," New York Times, Feb. 21.

The news that the Supreme Court is revisiting the use of race as a factor in admissions decisions, just nine years after upholding it in a University of Michigan case, has admissions officials worried about maintaining diversity and confounded that the question is being reconsidered so soon...

"Counting justices," Inside Higher Ed, Feb. 22.

Twenty-five years passed between the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court in the Bakke and Grutter cases. Both rulings upheld the right of colleges to consider race and ethnicity in admissions, but only in certain circumstances (and a companion case with Grutter rejected the use of race in other circumstances). Now, only nine years after the latter rulings, the Supreme Court is returning to the issue of affirmative action in higher education...

"College admissions: How diversity factors in," Washington Post, Feb. 22.

The Supreme Court just agreed to effectively consider whether affirmative action should be eliminated in college admissions via a case in which a white student claimed that she was denied admissions to the University of Texas because of race. Amid this renewed attention to affirmative action in college admissions, here is a look at the issue by Jarrid Whitney, executive director of admissions and financial aid at the California Institute of Technology...

"Justices to revisit race issue," Wall Street Journal, Feb. 22.

The Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to revisit affirmative action in state-college admissions, suggesting a 2003 ruling that narrowly permitted race-conscious policies in public higher education may face tough scrutiny from today's more conservative court...

"Giving troubled students the brushoff," Column, Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 21.

...I want to push back on the latest trend in the journals, at the professional conferences, and in online discussion groups, in which institutions seek to limit campus counseling to students who are in need of short-term, developmental care, and "refer out" those who are at higher risk or require more specialized treatment...

"Accreditors caution American colleges as they create academic programs abroad," Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 22.

Universities are entering a brave new world when they set up collaborative degree or academic programs overseas, and they must be vigilant in ensuring proper academic standards. That was the message accreditors were delivering at a conference here of senior international officers -- along with a reminder that the accrediting organizations are watching...

"Tour highlights Obama's push for more collaboration between community colleges and businesses," Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 22.

Two high-profile representatives of the Obama administration will hit the road today on a three-day, five-state bus tour to draw attention to successful partnerships between community colleges and businesses...

International

"Iraq seeks to educate more students in U.S.," USA Today, Feb. 21.

The Iraqi government wants the USA to mold its best and brightest. Following Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's pledge last year to fund scholarships for 10,000 Iraqi students to study in the United States, the Iraqi government has dispatched several top officials to Washington as part of an effort to raise interest in their country's students...