UW System Clipsheet

October 14, 2011

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On Campus

"New chancellor Lovell to put UWM in spotlight," Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Oct. 13.

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee no longer will be known as a local commuter school, but an international research institution that fuels economic growth, helps solve the region's problems and boosts the number of college graduates in Wisconsin, Mike Lovell vowed on the eve of his inauguration as UWM's eighth chancellor...Lovell's vision for UWM - which he will formally articulate during his 3 p.m. inauguration Friday - calls for fundamental changes in campus culture...

"University of Wisconsin-Madison's 'Bucky Wagon' returns to duty," Appleton Post-Crescent, Oct. 13.

Bucky's got his ride back. The University of Wisconsin's classic bright red 1932 American LaFrance fire engine returns to duty at 6 p.m. today during the college's homecoming parade in Madison. It retains its vintage look, courtesy of volunteers from Town of Menasha-based Pierce Manufacturing Co., who performed much of the restoration and graphic design work...

"Pierce rebuilds famed 'Bucky Wagon'," WLUK-TV, Oct. 13.

Just in time for homecoming, a local company is helping keep a University of Wisconsin tradition alive. Fire truck maker Pierce Manufacturing recently rebuilt Madison's famous Bucky Wagon...

"Fifth-graders get glimpse of college life at UW-Green Bay Phuture Phoenix program," Green Bay Press-Gazette, Oct. 14.

Setting your own schedule, living in an apartment and walking around campus were among the things about college life that excited fifth-graders who visited the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Thursday. "This is so cool," said Valerie Greetan, who attends Oconto Falls Elementary School and spent the day on campus with about 500 other fifth-graders as part of Phuture Phoenix Day, the annual program aimed at helping young people think about education after high school...

"UW beginning farmer school 15-week course begins soon," Wisconsin Agriculturist , Oct. 14.

If you're an aspiring dairy or livestock farmer looking for some instruction and mentoring within reasonable driving distance, the Wisconsin School for Beginning Dairy and Livestock Farmers wants to hear from you. The school hopes to offer its distance education program at 17 sites around the state this year, but at least three students must sign up for a site for the program to be offered there...

"UW-Parkside grads study water quality," Racine Journal Times, Oct. 13.

Can water quality at Racine's North Beach get even better? Three recent University of Wisconsin-Parkside graduates spent summer working on that...

"UW football: Obscene chants are targeted," Wisconsin State Journal, Oct. 13.

University of Wisconsin football coach Bret Bielema had success after urging students to show up on time for the Nebraska game two weeks ago...But the next student challenge for Bielema and Alvarez likely won't be quite so easy to pull off. The two co-signed a letter that was e-mailed to student season ticket holders on Thursday, urging them to do away with the vulgar chants during games. The e-mails quickly generated a lot of attention on online message boards...

"UW students urged to clean up language," Husker Extra, Oct. 13.

...According to the Wisconsin State Journal, Barry Alvarez and Bret Bielema are the latest UW officials to tell potty-mouthed students to keep it clean at Badgers football games. The Badger athletic director and football coach sent an email Thursday to all student season ticket holders asking them to end the tradition of yelling obscenity-laced cheers back and forth at Camp Randall...

"Berquam: UW will supply IDs for voting," Daily Cardinal, Oct. 13.

Although a new state law disallows students from using their student ID as identification to vote, Dean of Students Lori Berquam said UW-Madison will provide students access to identification cards that will allow them to vote. Under the new law, student IDs are acceptable voter identification if they have an issuance date, expiration date within two years of the issuance date and a student signature. UW-Madison's IDs do not meet the requirements. At an Associated Students of Madison meeting Wednesday, Berquam said university administration is considering two ways of attaining eligible voter identification for students...

"UW-Green Bay had new contract for vice chancellor Tom Maki before he resigned, documents show," Associated Press, Oct. 13.

University of Wisconsin-Green Bay officials had a contract ready to rehire a vice chancellor days before he officially announced his resignation, documents obtained by The Associated Press show...

"More suspicion being raised about rehiring retired UWGB Vice-Chancellor," WTAQ-TV, Oct. 13.

Documents released today showed that UW Green Bay was ready to bring back vice-chancellor Tom Maki, even before he retired in March. State law allows public employees to be brought back at least 30 days after they retire. But there cannot be a deal struck ahead of that 30-day waiting period, so there's no intentional double-dipping from taxpayers...

"E-Mails show a contract was ready before controversial rehiring at Wisconsin campus," Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 13.

E-mails obtained by the Associated Press show that officials at the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay had a contract ready to rehire a vice chancellor days before he officially resigned, the news agency reported. A state agency is reviewing the rehiring of Thomas D. Maki, the campus's top financial official, about a month after he retired from his $131,000 position last spring, and a state legislator has threatened to hold up tuition legislation until he gets answers about whether there was a prearranged deal...

"Double-dipping debate," WGBA-TV, Oct. 13.

When UWGB Vice Chancellor of Finance and Business Tom Maki retired in March, it took Chancellor Tom Harden by surprise. "Chancellor Harden did not hear about Tom Maki's retirement until the week it happened, just days before,"says UWGBDirector of Communications Christopher Sampson. But emails obtained by the Associated Press show Harden and Maki discussed a new contract three days before Maki announced his resignation. State law says a rehire deal can't be reached before the employee leaves...

"'Double-dipping' by state workers in the spotlight," Capital Times, Oct. 14.

A longstanding practice that allows public workers to simultaneously collect their pension and a state paycheck has caught the attention of state lawmakers and top UW-Madison officials. This so-called practice of double-dipping by retired state workers who are hired back either to their exact position or another state post has come to attention recently, with news breaking this week that officials at UW-Green Bay had a contract ready to rehire Tom Maki, a high-ranking administrator, before he officially announced his resignation...

"Campus Connection: Rally at UW-Richland to show support for imprisoned former student," Capital Times, Oct. 13.

Members of the UW-Richland campus community are holding a rally Friday to show support for Ali Almajed, a graduate of the school who is reportedly imprisoned in Bahrain...

"Chancellor's corner: Visit to Green Bay," Blog, Superior Telegram, Oct. 14.

The Board of Regents met last week in Green Bay. Highlights include presentations from UW-Green Bay personnel on their university's focus on interdisciplinarity and sustainability. UW-Parkside presented its academic plan. Of particular note was the presentation by Mark Nook, Interim Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs on how UW campuses were addressing issues of transferring students and academic credit...

"Parents can help college students resist alcohol," Column, Stevens Point Journal, Oct. 13.

Now that college students are on campus, they look forward to new friendships, new experiences and making memories that will last a lifetime. For some students, college also can be a time of excessive drinking and dealing with its aftermath...

"UW Extension offers learning session," Marshfield News Herald, Oct. 13.

"What's Your Parenting Style?" is being offered from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday at Marshfield Public Library, presented by Julie Simek-Heggebo, Clark County University of Wisconsin-Extension family living agent...

"150 years of UW alumni," Editorial, WISC-TV, Oct. 12.

This weekend, the Wisconsin Alumni Association is throwing a little party to celebrate its 150th anniversary. My hunch is if you wanted a ticket to the bash you could still get one but don't quote me -- call the WAA. But some 700 or so alumni are planning to don their red party duds at a celebration at the Institutes for discovery that will among other things raise up to 150-thousand dollars for scholarships...

"Don't miss Chazen Museum's state-of-the-art addition," Editorial, Capital Times, Oct. 14.

Russell Panczenko, the director of the UW-Madison’s Chazen Museum of Art, is justifiably proud of the just-completed addition to the museum on University Avenue. Now he wants to show it off not only to the students and faculty, but to the people of Madison and the surrounding communities...

"Broadway, the Negro problem and SpongeBob," Isthmus, Oct. 13.

A Tony and Obie award winner is artist in residence at the UW-Madison's Arts Institute. But your kids might know him best for his work on SpongeBob SquarePants...

"Where to eat at Union South," Isthmus, Oct. 13.

The new Union South has six dining spaces that have opened fulltime only this fall. The wide selection of cuisines and the modern, clean ambiance of each eatery is an appealing change from the sub-sandwich-ridden cafes that dominate other university options. The only problem is deciding where to start. Here's a cheat sheet...

"TAA awarded for protests at Capitol," Daily Cardinal, Oct. 14.

The UW-Madison Teaching Assistants Association and Madison Teachers Incorporated received an award in Washington D.C. Wednesday for their protest efforts last winter against Gov. Scott Walker's budget bill...

State

"JFC passes bill to increase technical college grants," Badger Herald, Oct. 13.

The Joint Finance Committee unanimously passed a bill Wednesday that would provide a $400,000 increase in manufacturing grants for state technical colleges...

"WITC System seeks input on future priorities," Superior Telegram, Oct. 14.

The Wisconsin Technical College System Board and Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College are inviting the public to share perspectives on the system's priorities for the next four years with a brief, web-based survey. A link to the survey is available at witc.edu. The WTCS board will consider results of the survey as they identify priorities for the next four years...

National

"As online courses grow, so does financial aid fraud," New York Times, Oct. 13.

...With the huge expansion of online college courses, financial aid scams have become a serious problem: as of Aug. 1, the inspector general had opened 100 investigations into distance-education fraud involving thousands of suspects; such crimes now make up about 17 percent of the agency's open cases, and investigators are working on 49 new complaints, scrambling to keep up...

"At U.S.-India summit, leaders call for more collaboration in higher education," Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 13.

The first U.S.-India Higher Education Summit, held here Thursday and attended by more than 300 academics, business leaders, and government officials, showcased plenty of good will between the two countries. But it also drew out the many challenges they face as they seek deeper, broader and more sustained collaboration...

International

"Squeezed out in India, students turn to U.S," New York Times, Oct. 13.

...Ms. Mohan, 18, is now one of a surging number of Indian students attending American colleges and universities, as competition in India has grown formidable, even for the best students. With about half of India's 1.2 billion people under the age of 25, and with the ranks of the middle class swelling, the country's handful of highly selective universities are overwhelmed. This summer, Delhi University issued cutoff scores at its top colleges that reached a near-impossible 100 percent in some cases. The Indian Institutes of Technology, which are spread across the country, have an acceptance rate of less than 2 percent — and that is only from a pool of roughly 500,000 who qualify to take the entrance exam, a feat that requires two years of specialized coaching after school...