UW System Clipsheet

April 4, 2011

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UW System

"Olsen column: Remove UW split from budget," Op-ed, Baraboo News Republic, April 2.

...In this budget, UW-Madison is the only campus that would benefit from these cost savings. If we can save so many tax dollars at that campus, why would we not extend those savings across the entire university system? Whether intentional or not, the proposal splinters off UW-Madison from the rest of the UW System... (Author: State Sen. Luther Olsen, R-Berlin)

"Commentary: UW-System priorities: Grow people, jobs, communities," Racine Journal Times, April 4.

As Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Parkside, I fully support the Wisconsin Idea Partnership and its goals to keep the University of Wisconsin System as a unified, world-class provider of higher education and to provide maximum flexibility from state bureaucracy to all UW System campuses. These flexibilities will allow all UW chancellors to lead their campuses in meeting the needs of our regions and our state using 21st century management practices... (Author: UW-Parkside Chancellor Debbie Ford)

"Quick Question: Is splitting UW-Madison from the UW System a good idea?," Capital Times, April 2.

Here'show five people answered this week's question posed by Capital Times freelancer Kevin Murphy...

"Moving forward via a unified UW System," Op-ed, West Bend Daily News, April 1.

I fear for the future of higher education in Wisconsin. I fear that any breakdown in higher education soon affects jobs and the business climate for all of us. And, more important for West Bend, it affects the local community. The University of Wisconsin-Washington County maintains high quality at an affordable cost. More than many institutions, the UW-Washington County does more with less. Our cost per student and the graduation rate of our transfers speaks to our success in providing affordable, quality access to higher education for Wisconsin... (Author: Paul Price, interim campus dean, UW-Washington County)

On Campus

"Wisconsin stands up for professor," Inside Higher Ed, April 4.

If the Wisconsin Republican Party's perceived attack on the academic freedom of a prominent faculty member at the University of Wisconsin at Madison was seen as a test for Chancellor Carolyn A. (Biddy) Martin -- with some wondering whether Governor Scott Walker's backing of the university's push for autonomy would compel her to hold her tongue -- she appears to have passed...

"The Cronon affair: Wisconsin answers," The New Yorker, April 3.

Universities don't seem to breed much civil courage these days. But the University of Wisconsin is a glorious exception to the rule. When the Republican Party of Wisconsin demanded e-mails sent by and to William Cronon, it was the university—which serves as the official "record holder" for this purpose—rather than the individual professor that had to answer the request. It has now done so, with two lucid documents that show scrupulous concern for the rights of all involved...

"Bill Lueders: Request for Cronon's emails was lawful," Column, Wisconsin State Journal, April 4.

I dissent from Friday's guest column by UW Profs. Howard Schweber and Donald Downs portraying a records request from the state Republican Party as an attempt to "silence political opponents"... Author: Bill Lueders, president, Wisconsin Freedom of Information Council)

"Motive is no part of open records law," Editorial, Appleton Post-Crescent, April 3.

Let's keep this as simple as we possibly can: An open record is an open record is an open record. It doesn't matter who's making an open records request. They don't even have to identify themselves...

"Using open-records laws to harass scholars," Editorial, Washington Post, April 1.

Transparency in government is important. Freedom-of-information laws are key to assuring it; they offer citizens a vehicle for finding out what their government is doing. But freedom-of-information requests can also be used in abusive ways, to intimidate political adversaries and chill free speech. That risk is especially high with open-records requests involving professors at public universities...

"Students take spring break seriously," Pioneer Press, April 3.

Spring break for many college students entails drinking beer in a warm climate or sleeping late and eating home-cooked meals. But for about 50 students at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, spring break this year was about lending a hand...

"Recession slows Hmong migration," Wausau Daily Herald, April 2.

The Hmong community in the United States continues to spread to new places, but the recession has slowed the pattern of migration from traditional population centers to Southern states. That's the thesis of Chia Vang, an assistant professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee...

"GOP smacked down on Wisconsin emails," Salon, April 1.

The University of Wisconsin has released its response to the open records request from the Republican Party of Wisconsin seeking access to history professor William Cronon's emails...Defenders of academic freedom against political thuggery might be disappointed to learn that the university decided that it had no choice but to release some emails. But it did so only after winnowing the database...

"GOP fails to get all of professor's email," Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, April 1.

Citing issues of academic freedom and privacy, the University of Wisconsin-Madison released some but not all emails written by a prominent UW professor that the Republican Party had sought through an open records request...

"New chancellor for UWS recommended," Duluth News Tribune, April 2.

Renee Wachter of Truman State University in Missouri has been recommended to be the next chancellor at the University of Wisconsin-Superior...

"UWS has suggestion for new chancellor," Fox21-TV, April 1.

When it comes to finding a replacement for the top job at UWS, staff members have a suggestion. Dr. Renee Wachter from Truman State University in Missouri is recommended as the next chancellor...

"Campus Connection: Wachter recommended as next UW-Superior chancellor," Capital Times, April 1.

The dean of the School of Business at Truman State University is in line to be the next chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Superior. UW System President Kevin Reilly and a special committee of the Board of Regents announced Friday they are recommending Renée Wachter for the top spot at UW-Superior...

"Tour offers sneak peek of UW's new Union South," WISC-TV, April 2.

A nearly $100 million structure is just two weeks away from opening its doors to the public. Five years of planning and work is just about complete for the new University of Wisconsin-Madison Union South...

"New website launch to coincide with Union South opening," WISC-TV, April 1.

The new Wisconsin Union website has a new look. The site coincides with the opening of the new Union South on Friday, April 15. The website is designed to provide a user focused experience with a look that reflects the spirit of the heart and soul of University of Wisconsin-Madison -- the Wisconsin Union...

"Wisconsin-Madison to release professor's e-mails but withhold those said to be private," Chronicle of Higher Education, April 1.

The University of Wisconsin at Madison said on Friday that it would release to the state's Republican Party records a party official had sought from the e-mail account of a Madison professor who had criticized the governor and Republican-backed legislation to curtail the collective-bargaining rights of university and other public employees in the state...

"Zimmermann slaying investigation continues 3 years later," WISC-TV, April 1.

The three-year anniversary of the death of University of Wisconsin-Madison student Brittany Zimmermann serves as a solemn reminder of the loss not only to those that knew the 21-year-old, but also to the members of the community that sought justice on her behalf...

"Number of reported sexual assaults rises," Daily Cardinal, April 4.

The number of sexual assaults reported to the Dean of Students Office increased from 45 cases last year to 112 this year. But this is a good thing, according to Tonya Schmidt, an assistant dean in the Division of Student Life, because it means more victims are seeking help­—not necessarily that there were more sexual assaults...

"South campus sensation: New building sets 'standard for 21st Century' student union," Wisconsin State Journal, April 4.

Student unions are called the living rooms of college campuses. But UW-Madison's new Union South is more like a playground...

"Storm-chasing journalist, extreme-weather adventurer to speak today at UW-Platteville," Dubuque Telegraph-Herald, April 4.

Warren Faidley, called the world's first storm-chasing journalist and extreme-weather adventurer, will speak today at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville...

"UW a force in pain drug growth," Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, April 2.

...The article did not disclose that their UW Pain&Policy Studies Group already had pocketed most of the $2.5 million it would be paid over the years by the very companies that made the dangerous drugs - firms that stood to lose if prescribing rules were tightened, a Journal Sentinel investigation found. Fueled by a continuous infusion of money from the manufacturers of drugs such as OxyContin over more than a decade, the UW research group has been a quiet force in the effort to liberalize the way those drugs are prescribed and viewed in the United States. In addition, records show cozy personal financial relationships between drug makers and two officials with the UW Pain Group, Aaron Gilson and David Joranson...

"127 students, 30 colleges participate in 10th anniversary Dairy Challenge," Holstein World, April .

An innovative dairy educational program celebrated its 10th anniversary March 31-April 2 in Hickory, N.C. Over 10 years, North American Intercollegiate Dairy Challenge (NAIDC) has helped prepare over 3000 students for careers in the dairy industry. The 10th annual contest attracted 127 college students from 30 schools across the United States and Canada...The team from UW-River Falls included Alex Geiser, Paul Lippert, Leonard Polzin and Anne Spillman, coached by Sylvia Kehoe and Dennis Cooper...

"Students battle for the gold at Science Olympiad," WEAU-TV, April 2.

Hundreds of high school students from all over the state battled it out for the gold in the Science Olympiad today at UW-Stout...

"Stout takeout goes reusable," Volume One, April 1.

Recently, UW-Stout upped its commitment to the three Rs. No, I don't mean reading, writing, and 'rithmetic (they're already doing fine with those), I'm talking about the three environmental Rs: reducing, reusing, and recycling. Stout's been offering compostable takeout containers for two years now, but this February the school decided to take it a step further and offer takeout containers that are completely reusable as well...

State

"MATC full-time faculty earn more on average than faculty at most UW campuses," Wisconsin State Journal, April 3.

Full-time faculty members at Madison Area Technical College earned an average base pay of $79,030 last year, more than the average professor earned at all University of Wisconsin System campuses except UW-Madison...

"Learn to reciprocate," Editorial, The Minnesota Daily, April 4.

More than 10,000 Wisconsin students studying in Minnesota — the majority of whom attend the University of Minnesota — could be paying more for college next year. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker wants to end the state’s 43-year-old tuition reciprocity agreement...

"Judge keeps restraining order in place," Wisconsin Radio Network, April 1.

A temporary restraining order blocking enactment of the budget repair bill will remain in place until Republican lawmakers can appear in court. The ruling comes after Dane County District Attorney Ismael Ozanne rested his case Friday in a lawsuit claiming passage of the bill violated the open meetings law...

"Judge's move puts indefinite hold on collective bargaining bill," WISC-TV, April 1.

A Dane County judge said she's keeping in place her restraining order preventing a law that would strip most public workers of a majority of their collective bargaining rights from going into effect while she considers whether a law was broken in the process of passing the law...

"MU student may have bacterial meningitis," Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, April 3.

A Marquette University student has been hospitalized with a possible diagnosis of bacterial meningitis, according to a news release Sunday from the university...

"South Division students take MATC class for college credit, preparation," Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, April 3.

...They are among 10 South Division High School students who are getting a jump on their academic futures through a pilot program started in January that allows the students to take a class at MATC and earn college credit while completing their high school studies. The initiative, called Driving Dreams through Education, is one of 10 funded across the country by the Ford Motor Co...

"AAUW conference in Neenah to showcase group's advocacy work on behalf of women," Appleton Post-Crescent, April 1.

Many in the Fox Valley know the work of the American Association of University Women for one thing — an annual used book sale. But AAUW is much more than that, and a state conference to be held in Neenah later this week will demonstrate just that. For 129 years, AAUW’s mission has been about advancing equity for girls and women...

"UWSP to host state finance committee budget hearings," Stevens Point Journal, April 3.

Central Wisconsin residents will have the chance Thursday to tell Wisconsin legislators face-to-face what they think of the state's 2011-13 budget. The Joint Committee on Finance will hold one of four public hearings throughout the state from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the Laird Room of the Dreyfus University Center on the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point campus. With plenty of contentious issues packed into the budget -- from cuts to local government aid to the split of the UW System -- the hearing will allow residents to testify in-person without having to travel to Madison...

"Municipal group wants legislature to include police and firefighters in collective bargaining changes," Wisconsin Public Radio, April 1.

Leaders of some of Wisconsin’s larger communities want the legislature to require police officers and firefighters to pay more for their pension and health insurance. The governor’s budget repair bill already requires that of other state and local worker unions, though a court challenge has held up the law so far...

National

"The faculty take on student learning," Inside Higher Ed, April 4.

As national and campus debates about student learning outcomes and now college completion have intensified in the last several years, faculty groups and individual professors have largely weighed in from the sidelines, rarely stepping into the actual fray. Whether that's because they have chosen not to participate, or because the policy makers and politicians leading the discussions have not sought to involve them, is a matter of debate -- and both are probably true...

"Rallying back," Inside Higher Ed, April 4.

The fact that the American Federation of Teachers' annual meeting on higher education took place in a hotel here alongside the American Professional Wound Care Association was, to be sure, a quirk of scheduling. But the irony was not lost on several of those attending. Organized labor has suffered punishing blows in recent days and weeks, in Wisconsin and Ohio, with the promise of further attacks on collective bargaining to come in other states, such as Indiana, Michigan and Florida...

"The other 'summer melt' in admissions," Inside Higher Ed, April 4.

"Summer melt" -- referring to those students who commit to enroll at a given college but then don't do so -- has been the subject of much discussion in recent years...But there is another kind of summer melt -- one that may have much more of a societal impact than whether a middle class student ends up at College A or College B and one that affects students who wouldn't have the money to put down multiple deposits. This kind of summer melt involves low-income students who have almost made it into college, but may not make it there -- students who applied, were admitted, filled out their financial aid forms, and qualified for substantial assistance...

"Should professors be political?," Washington Post, April 1.

...A significant portion of the professoriate sees engagement in politics as part of the job description. And, unfortunately, they are right. It is becoming harder and harder to find professors devoted to teaching traditional academic subjects for their own sake, to undergraduates who lack the basics in the humanities and the social and natural sciences. The academy has not become politicized because of a few radical professors. Rather, entire departments and university administrations see the goal of higher education as political. At a time when the percentage of students needing remedial education is at an all-time high, when the need for job training beyond high school is pressing and when we worry about how even our top students will compete with their peers around the world, political activism should be at the bottom of any university’s list of priorities...

"Pay of state university presidents holds steady despite cuts," New York Times, April 3.

In a year in which state universities often absorbed sharp budget cuts and raised tuition, the salaries of the presidents of those institutions largely held steady, according to a survey by The Chronicle of Higher Education released Sunday night...

"Biden to discuss new guidelines about campus sex crimes," New York Times, April 4.

Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. is urging the nation's schools and colleges to do more to prevent sexual violence, saying campus sex crimes often go unreported because victims fear that universities will not discipline offenders...

"More employers hiring college-educated workers," USA Today, April 3.

College-educated workers are clearly reaping the benefits of a strengthening job market, but economists worry that Americans with lesser skills could be left behind...

"As universities fend off budget cuts, some researchers see possible benefits," Chronicle of Higher Education, April 3.

As the federal government veers toward a possible shutdown this week, Republican lawmakers may have found some unexpected support for their quest to cut money for academic research: university researchers...

"Presidents defend their pay as public colleges slash budgets," Chronicle of Higher Education, April 3.

...The highest-paid public-college executives, who receive compensation packages in the high six figures and more, walk a difficult political tightrope. They must at once argue that their state budgets have been cut to the bone and need to be restored, while at the same time acknowledging their rarefied personal financial circumstances in states where layoffs, program closures, and pay reductions have been all too common. In making that case, presidents and the trustees who set their salaries have for years argued that, irrespective of economic conditions, those presidential pay levels are fair, necessary, and performance-driven...

"The UO takes a needed timeout," Editorial, The Oregonian, April 2.

Delay will give the university a chance to win broader support for higher ed reform that must address systemwide issues of cost, access and financial stability...

"State by state, colleges team up to recruit students from abroad," Chronicle of Higher Education, April 3.

...The models vary, but the groups generally engage in cooperative marketing and student-recruitment ventures, such as sponsoring shared booths at student fairs overseas, joining forces to travel abroad, collaborating on promotional Web sites, and jointly playing host to visiting delegations of foreign college counselors. They can also provide a forum for exchanging best practices and recruitment strategies...

"Librarians put increasing value on their role in support of student learning," Chronicle of Higher Education, April 4.

Supporting undergraduate education and teaching information literacy to students are chief priorities for academic libraries, trumping their traditional emphasis on collection-building and the preservation and discovery of research materials...