UW System Clipsheet

UW System Clipsheet - September 2, 2009

September 2, 2009

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On Campus

"New biomass plant will build green economy," Editorial, Wausau Daily Herald, Sept. 2.

...The University of Wisconsin Marathon County officially broke ground last week on an expansion project at the corner of Stewart and Seventh avenues, and we are glad to see the project progress. The two-story building that is planned there will house a theater, two classrooms and offices for the Wisconsin Institute for Public Policy and Service, Wisconsin Public Radio's office and a couple of academic departments. Getting the project going required a balancing act, as the university had to appraise and purchase more than 10 houses on the block...

"Four-year university graduation contracts could be revived," Leader-Telegram, Sept. 2.

A seldom-used policy at Wisconsin's public universities guarantees that a student can graduate in four years by signing a voluntary contract and adhering to a set academic program. Instituted more than a decade ago, these four-year graduation agreements exist at all UW System schools, but students infrequently seek them, said Cynthia Graham, senior academic planner for the UW System...Three to five UW-Eau Claire students request a contract each year, said Kris Anderson, the university's executive director of enrollment services and admission. UW-Eau Claire is proposing a multi-million dollar initiative to increase the number of students who graduate in four years...

"UW: Students need not fret over conduct code change," Badger Herald, Sept. 1.

On June 5, the Board of Regents, governing body of the University of Wisconsin System, passed policy revisions made to student conduct code policies, which went into effect Sept. 1. With its passage, UW System students brought up concerns as to what these changes mean and how far the reach of the university can go when taking action against students for crimes committed off university property...

"On Campus: UW-Madison to send tuition bills by e-mail," Blog, Wisconsin State Journal, Sept. 2.

...UW-Madison is transitioning to a system of sending tuition bills by e-mail, rather than snail mail. Students and parents can also pay the bills online, see immediately when their payment has gone through, and view a real-time balance...

"Record enrollment at La Crosse colleges," La Crosse Tribune, Sept. 2.

La Crosse's three higher education institutions all report having a record number of students attending classes this semester, officials said...The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse as of Tuesday had about 8,700 full-time and part-time undergraduate students enrolled, more than any year in the past two decades, which is as far back as UW System data goes,said Teri Hinds, UW-L director of institutional research...

"New UW-La Crosse academic building on the way," Wisconsin Public Radio, Sept. 2.

UW-La Crosse officials will have a ceremonial groundbreaking Wednesday for the first new classroom facility since the 1970s. Construction crews have already been working away on the 180,000 square foot Centennial Hall according to UWL Chancellor Joe Gow...

"UW-Baraboo opens doors to 600 students," Baraboo News Republic, Sept. 2.

The University of Wisconsin-Baraboo/Sauk County will welcome approximately 600 students to campus today, as classes get started for the fall semester at the two-year liberal arts campus...Jurvelin said full-time enrollment this year, at 425 students as of Monday, is expected to be the second highest in UW-Baraboo history...

"UWO earns national accreditation for CAPP," Oshkosh Northwestern, Sept. 1.

A program at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh has provided a low-cost academic jumpstart for Wisconsin high school students for 35 years. The Cooperative Academic Partnership Program (CAPP) gives juniors and seniors the opportunity to earn college credits while they are still in high school at half the cost of UW-Oshkosh per-credit tuition...In July, UW Oshkosh's CAPP program became the first nationally accredited program of its kind in Wisconsin by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships...

"UW project sites on track," Badger Herald, Sept. 1.

With the summer construction season winding down to a close, a number of campus projects are all on time for completion and within their budgetary requirements. The projects include Union South, the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, the Education Building and University Avenue...

"City, group work to bridge new UWSP students, community," Stevens Point Journal, Sept. 2.

Today marks another year of classes at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. But the fresh start of school also can mean calls to police about loud parties and vandalism. And it can mean some apprehension for longtime residents of the area when a new wave of students moves in...The Old Main Neighborhood Association is a group that promotes campus and neighborhood pride with respect and communication, Nebel said...

"DeLuca planning to focus on incoming students, advising," Badger Herald, Sept. 1.

Nearly a month into his new position as the University of Wisconsin's provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs, Paul DeLuca Jr. has begun to look at undergraduate advising, student aid and address issues related to implementing the Madison Initiative for Undergraduates...

"UW-Madison hikes campus parking rates," WISC-TV, Sept. 2.

Parking officials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison said they have no choice but to raise parking rates on campus as they try to keep up with costs and the university puts up more buildings. New parking ramps are part of a campus master plan to conserve space and keep employee parking stalls capped at 13,000, but both those things will continue to mean higher parking fees for visitors and staff alike, WISC-TV reported...

"Administrators move Madison Initiative forward," Badger Herald, Sept. 1.

Since the May 8 vote to adopt the Madison Initiative for Undergraduates by the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents, administrators have been working diligently toward its implementation, hiring new staff and taking a close look at need-based student aid...

State

"Herzing U. to open Kenosha campus," Business Journal of Milwaukee, Sept. 2.

Herzing University will open a Kenosha campus in a former Aurora Health Care building in November. The campus, at 4006 Washington Road near Bradford High School, will offer associate and bachelor's degrees in technology, business, health care, design and public safety...

"Wis. Assembly moves to restart IT oversight panel," Associated Press, Sept. 2.

The speaker of the state Assembly is reconstituting a panel that oversees lucrative state information technology work, after being criticized for keeping the posts vacant while expensive projects moved forward. Speaker Mike Sheridan on Wednesday appointed Democratic Reps. Gary Sherman of Port Wing, Marlin Schneider of Wisconsin Rapids and Cory Mason of Racine to the 10-member joint Assembly-Senate panel. Sheridan said the panel, known as the Joint Committee on Information Policy and Technology, would also meet more often than it has in recent years...

"Honey? Where's my backpack?," Column, Janesville Gazette, Sept. 2.

...Of course, the "baby" has an Adam's apple and a couple tattoos, and he's joining a potentially record-breaking class at UW-Rock County. Watching from the outside, I’ve seen nothing easy about going back to school as an adult. School requires a unique set of skills and commitment...

National

"'Hot' jobs? Health care, energy, many not requiring bachelor's," USA Today, Sept. 2.

The hottest job areas from now to 2016 will be in health care, education, information technology and clean energy, a new report says. And though some require bachelor's degrees or higher, many call for an associate's degree and sometimes additional vocational training...

"H1N1 creeps onto campuses," Inside Higher Ed, Sept. 2.

A summer of anticipation and worst-case-scenario planning has given way to a new academic year of inevitable illness as the H1N1 flu virus appears at colleges and universities across the nation. As many institutions ratchet up to full capacity with students, faculty and staff returning for fall classes, campuses from Kansas to California and just about everywhere in between are beginning to report handfuls to hundreds of cases, mostly among students...

"Early pomp and circumstance," Chronicle of Higher Education, Sept. 2.

For an increasing number of college administrators, hosting an opening convocation ceremony is not just tradition for tradition's sake; many believe the ritual can improve student retention...

"The message: Your money can keep our students enrolled," Chronicle of Higher Education, Sept. 1.

For $200, you can pay for one University of Maryland student's orientation fees. A thousand dollars will buy textbooks for a year, and $8,000 will cover in-state tuition and fees at the flagship campus in College Park. Those suggested gifts, along with videos of students who rely on aid, are featured on a colorful Web site designed for the university's "Keep Me Maryland" campaign. The effort is a catchy twist on something many colleges are trying to do: raise money for immediate student-aid needs...

"For $6,000, restoration of canceled college class," New York Times, Sept. 1.

...For $6,000, the City College of San Francisco is offering sponsors a chance to restore one of the hundreds of classes being canceled because of budget cuts. Even after freezing hiring, cutting student support services, and reducing administrative salaries, the college is facing a $20 million deficit that has forced it to cut or postpone almost 800 courses this year -- about 300 in the fall, and 500 in the spring...

"Harvard backs off media policy," New York Times, Sept. 1.

Harvard Medical School is backing off a new student policy that would have restricted interaction with the news media after students complained it would chill their ability to talk about current issues in medicine, school officials said Tuesday...

"Rating colleges by their contribution to the social good," New York Times, Sept. 2.

Washington Monthly magazine came out with its own college rankings today, naming the nation's "best" colleges from a very different vantage point from that of U.S. News and World Report. The Washington Monthly ratings try to measure which colleges do the most for the social good, by improving social mobility, producing research and promoting service...By those lights, the top three universities in the nation are all part of the University of California system: Berkeley, San Diego, and U.C.L.A. Thirteen of the top 20 national universities are public, while Harvard comes in at number 11, Yale at 23, and Princeton at 28. (In the U.S. News rankings, none of the top 20 national universities are public.)...

"U-Texas pulls out of merit scholarship program," Associated Press, Sept. 1.

The University of Texas at Austin is pulling out of the National Merit Scholarship Program to focus on needs-based financial assistance...