UW System Clipsheet

March 6, 2009

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UW System

"University of Wisconsin-Madison chancellor paints grim picture," Wisconsin State Journal, March 6.

UW-Madison Chancellor Biddy Martin on Thursday painted a grim picture of the university’s fortunes under Gov. Jim Doyle’s proposed budget, saying it could result in the loss of faculty and staff, the elimination of courses, and caps on the numbers of students in popular programs. Martin, speaking at a UW Board of Regents meeting, said she asked the deans of UW-Madison schools and colleges to explore how they would reduce 5 percent of their budgets, which roughly equals its share of cuts...

"University of Wisconsin System leaders sound alarm on state budget cuts," Capital Times, March 6.

Leaders from across the University of Wisconsin System sounded a collective alarm Thursday during a Board of Regents meeting on the UW-Madison campus, stressing that state budget cuts would deeply impact students. "Let us take our share of the pain," UW-Madison Chancellor Carolyn "Biddy" Martin told the regents. "But let us not undermine the extraordinary quality of a UW-Madison or UW System degree"...

"UW chancellors say budget cuts will be painful," WISC-TV, March 6.

University of Wisconsin-Madison Chancellor Biddy Martin said Thursday that state budget cuts could force her campus to limit enrollment in some programs, cut course sections and do less research. Martin spoke to the UW System Board of Regents on Thursday, along with chancellors who run UW-La Crosse, UW-Extension and UW Colleges...

Watch: http://www.c3ktogo.com/news-video/?mgid=21315

"Budget cuts could slow UW's growth," Associated Press, March 5.

Proposed budget cuts would force the University of Wisconsin System to cut academic programs and impede its plans to educate more students and do more research, university officials warned Thursday. President Kevin Reilly said the Growth Agenda - a long-term plan in which campuses boost enrollments, expand some academic programs and improve research - would be slowed under Gov. Jim Doyle's budget...

"Editorial: Don't skim from UW to balance budget," Editorial, Sheboygan Press, March 6.

Gov. Jim Doyle should rethink his plan to require the University of Wisconsin to transfer money from private donations to help balance the state budget...We have no problem with the UW shouldering its share of the state's budget woes. But Doyle also wants the UW to set aside about $11 million from gifts and donations made to UW foundations. Not surprisingly, UW officials aren't too happy with Doyle's budget-balancing act...

"UW-EC, Stout budget-tightening under way," Leader-Telegram, March 5.

Chancellors at UW-Eau Claire and UW-Stout said Thursday that their institutions will continue to provide quality education despite looming state cuts. The UW System Board of Regents approved guidelines for a $120 million reduction in state support in Gov. Jim Doyle's proposed budget. UW-Eau Claire would receive $8.65 million less in state aid if the Legislature approves the 2009-11 state budget as submitted...UW-Stout could lose $6.42 million in the budget. Chancellor Charles Sorenson is "slowing down some hiring for the fall" and using cash reserves to bridge the gap in state funding...

"UW regents discuss fairness of financial aid plan," La Crosse Tribune, March 6.

Gov. Jim Doyle’s proposed $25 million in college financial aid means students will pay for other students’ education, said University of Wisconsin System Regent Colleene Thomas. A Wisconsin student from a family making $60,000 a year or less who receives financial aid from the plan could, in turn, see residence hall costs rise to help colleges pay for providing that additional aid, Thomas said at a Board of Regents meeting Thursday in Madison. Thomas, a UW-Madison student, said she’s heard from students throughout the system who are frustrated about the unequal amounts UW System schools have to contribute for the financial aid. UW-L will pay $5.4 million from its reserve funds, more than twice as much as any other UW System school...

"UWM neighbors laud disciplinary proposal," Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, March 6.

A proposal to extend the disciplinary reach of state universities beyond campus grounds was lauded Thursday night by neighbors of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee frustrated by what they say has been years of unruly student behavior. But students from several UW System schools told a public hearing the proposed revisions to the State Administrative Code would stifle due process and punish students twice for minor municipal violations...

"Students fight change to discipline rules," Associated Press, March 6.

Extending discipline of University of Wisconsin System students beyond campus grounds drew opposition from students at a public hearing and a call for action from university neighbors. Students say revising the State Administrative Code would punish students twice for minor municipal violations...

"UW group speaks out against changes to misconduct code," Daily Cardinal, March 6.

The United Council of UW Students is opposing proposed changes to the UW System code of conduct that could crucially change how the university disciplines students. According to Michael Moscicke, university affairs director for the council, the organization is concerned with the possible hazard to students’ rights in proposed revisions to Chapter 17 of the administrative code, which deals with conduct of UW students. One objection involves the chance that the university could punish students for off-campus offenses...

"Board of Regents streamlines campus construction projects," Badger Herald, March 6.

The University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents unanimously passed a resolution Thursday to streamline the capital planning and budgeting process for university construction projects in an effort to save time and money. The board also passed a resolution to raise the threshold amount the system can spend on building construction plans without having to get the plans passed by the state Legislature. The plan was passed to catch up with inflated prices and allow the projects to be constructed more efficiently...

"UW System to seek stimulus funds for construction," Associated Press, March 5.

University of Wisconsin System officials are planning to seek a share of the economic stimulus package recently approved by Congress...

On Campus

"University says double majoring not beneficial," Badger Herald, March 6.

A recent surge in the number of University of Wisconsin students pursuing multiple majors has raised questions among university officials regarding the effectiveness of such actions. UW students can currently major in an unlimited number of majors, provided they can complete the required courses...

"Students build homes during spring break," Superior Telegram, March 5.

Ten University of Wisconsin-Superior students travel to Montana later this month to help build affordable housing during the university’s annual alternative spring break trip...

"University of Wisconsin-Madison is issuing fewer parking tickets," Wisconsin State Journal, March 5.

Despite their sometimes hard-hearted reputation, UW-Madison parking enforcers are writing fewer tickets and extracting less money from motorists than in prior years, according to a State Journal review of citations data. And here’s something to keep in mind: complaining about a ticket usually works. The university has dismissed 68 percent of the tickets appealed by motorists since 2005...

"UWS undertakes green revolution," Superior Telegram, March 5.

A revolution is underway at the University of Wisconsin-Superior and it’s visible in the construction of tall buildings, narrower margins on class reports, the lack of Styrofoam cups and hopping on a bus. “UW-Superior is going green,” said Tom Fennessey, director of facilities management...

"UWSP students agree to fund late bus," Stevens Point Journal, March 6.

Stevens Point may get two new bus routes this fall, and the city won't have to pay a dime. Stevens Point Transit, the Police Department and the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point student government have been working for years to hammer out the deal. But getting a student agreement is what pushed the project.UWSP approved using student fees to pay for its portion of the project, with the rest of the money coming from the federal and state governments...

"University to continue scholarships, financial aid for students despite economic troubles," (UW-River Falls) Student Voice, March 5.

As the spring semester flies by, students will soon begin to plan for next fall by meeting with their advisor, sign up for classes and ultimately determine how to afford another year of education during this tough economic state...During this tough economic recovery, UWRF holds strong to providing students with a strong financial aid system and hundreds of scholarships for the upcoming school year...

"2 from Wisconsin participate in Obama health care summit," Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, March 6.

...Stoffer was one of seven "everyday Americans" invited to the conference, which the White House billed as a launching pad for the drive to overhaul the health care system. That group included another Wisconsinite, Siavash Sarlati of Milwaukee, 24, a medical student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison...

State

"Doyle's budget a good, but expensive, start," Editorial, Journal Times, March 2.

Like our household budgets or any other, there is much to like and much to dislike in the proposed 2009-11 budget for the state of Wisconsin...Money aside, there are things to like in this budget. There is money to keep University of Wisconsin faculty salaries competitive so that we can attract talented people, and money to fully fund the SAGE program in public schools...

"Healthcare jobs part II: Education and Rewards," WKOW-TV, March 5.

Although the number of healthcare jobs and the salaries those jobs pay is expected to go up substantially over the next several years, the people who fill those jobs need special training ...It costs more to get a bachelor's degree in nursing from a four-year school like the University of Wisconsin or Edgewood. But career experts say four-year grads can also expect to make more money to start their nursing careers...

Watch: http://www.wkowtv.com...ne=info&rnd=60877507

National

"Recession alters parents' plans for kids' college," Chicago Tribune, March 6.

...For families mulling college options, affordability is weighing more heavily than it has in years, officials say. The federal stimulus approved last month promises more financial aid for college. but it's unclear what impact it will have...

"Hired! A new grad lands a new job," CNNMoney, March 6.

These days, getting a college degree doesn't guarantee you a job. And with so many new grads vying for a limited number of openings in the worst job market in years, it's tough to stand out in a crowd. Employers expect to hire 22% fewer new grads this year than they hired last year, according to a new study conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers. That's the first time hiring projections have fallen since 2002, NACE said...

"Sabbaticals on leave," Inside Higher Ed, March 6.

...It is perhaps no surprise that something that sounds as good as a sabbatical is now viewed in some quarters as a luxury these troubled times cannot abide. Several college leaders have announced in recent months that they will curtail or suspend sabbaticals altogether next year, opening a debate about whether granting research-intensive leave and professional development time is practical when colleges are laying off faculty or freezing hiring...

"College newspapers face weak ad revenue," USA Today, March 6.

Students working on college newspapers across the USA are learning an all-too-real-world lesson: Their papers face the same advertising revenue declines and expense cutbacks as their professional counterparts. Since the start of the current school year, daily newspapers at schools including Syracuse University, New York University, the University of California-Berkeley, Ball State, Boston University and Georgia Southern have cut one edition a week — usually Friday's — because of weak advertising...